Canadian Train Bridges and Trestles
British Columbia and the Territories



 
I decided to write this page on railway bridges after a visitor Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba offered to give me a number of railway bridge pictures that he had collected.
I again hope that my visitors will be sending me their pictures to be
included on this page.  johnmacdonald@summerville-novascotia.com

 
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Quebec and Ontario
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CNR Railway Bridge, Prince George BC
CNR bridge spanning the Frazer River at Prince George BC. This railway bridge was built by the Grand Trunk Pacific.
The river flowing into the Frazer at the upper right is the Nechako.This bridge was built by the Grand Trunk Pacific Rwy. c.1910
Another view from the opposite end of the CNR Railway Bridge, Prince George BC
This picture was submitted by Thomas Mills and is shown with other pictures in this area at http://whitesprucepress.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pid=30   This picture was taken in the fall of 2005
CP's Canadian eastbound going over the steel arch Stoney Creek bridge, about 50 miles east of Revelstoke B.C
This bridge is at the top of the 10 mile 2.2 grade from Rogers and is 265 ft to the bottom
This description was provided by James Walford, retired CP locomotive engineer
This picture was submitted by  Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba 
CN's Anderson River Railway Bridge in the the Frazer River Canyon
This picture was taken by Peter Maslak and was submitted by Jean Guy Hamel, Quebec, Canada
CNR Kinsol Trestle after re-furbishing Jan 27, 2013. 
It is located just north of Shawnigan Lake on Vancouver Island
This picture was submitted by Dave Ames, Duncan BC and was taken by his wife Mary Ames

 
CPR Windermere 14.58 near Wasa British Columbia over the Kootenay River
This series shows around the clock work to remove and replace 8 existing steel spans that had reached the end of their lifespan with 8 new ones.  Also to jacket all the piers and tie back the existing abutments.
The project started in 2013 and completed in May 2014.
The heavy lift was done in October 2013

Owner = CPR
General Contractor = SEMA Railway Structures (Toronto)
Heavy lift Contractor = Western Mechanical (Barrie Ontario)
Steel Fabricator = Structal (Quebec City)
Soil Anchor Contractor = BAT Construction

Pictures were submitted by Doug Webb
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Kettle Valley Railway Bridge in Myra Canyon

Kettle Valley Rwy. in the Myra Canyon near 
Kelowna BC was built by the Northern Pacific RR. 
in the early part of the 20th century and was late
r acquired by the CPR who abandoned the line c.1965. 
These trestles all burned in the big fire near Kelowna 
a few years ago.

This picture was submitted by Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Kettle Valley Railway Bridge in Myra Canyon
This picture was submitted by Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Kettle Valley Railway Bridge in Myra Canyon
This picture was submitted by Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Kettle Valley Railway Bridge in Myra Canyon
This picture was submitted by Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba
CN Wooden Train Trestle near Terrace, BC
This picture was taken by Phil Mason and was submitted by Jean Guy Hamel
CN Railway Trestles on the Kitimat Branch
This picture was taken by Phil Mason and was submitted by Jean Guy Hamel
CN Wooden Overpass near Kitimat, BC.
This picture was taken by Phil Mason and was submitted by Jean Guy Hamel
CN railway Bridge at Terrace, BC
This picture was taken by Phil Mason and was submitted by Jean Guy Hamel
A typical railway truss bridge in a view taken from the 
rear platform of the Rocky Mountaineer train in
May 2009. The Kicking Horse River flows under this 
bridge, located near Golden BC.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truss_bridge
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kicking_Horse_River
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Looking west on the rail bridge over the channel at
Sicamous BC (pronounced "sicamoose") from the rear 
of the Rocky Mountaineer train in May 2009.
On right side, Shuswap Lake, on the left side Mara Lake. 
Sicamous is midway between Vancouver and Calgary, Alberta, on the Trans-Canada Highway and is known as
"the houseboat capital of Canada". 
Hundreds are available for rental, due to large amounts 
of shoreline along each lake. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sicamous,_British_Columbia
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
CN Kitimat Branch Line bridge over the Skeena River
This picture was taken  Bill Walker and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
CN Kitimat Branch Line bridge over the Skeena River

The grey road bridge you see beside the rail bridge is
known in Terrace as the Old Skeena Bridge

This picture was taken  Bill Walker and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
CN Kitimat Branch Line bridge over the Skeena River
This picture was taken  Bill Walker and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
CN Kitimat Branch Line bridge over the Skeena River
This picture was taken  Bill Walker and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
CN Kitimat Branch Line bridge over the Skeena River
This picture was taken  Bill Walker and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
Porphyry Creek 001 This is a curved trestle bridge 
over 40 metres high across Porphyry Creek near Moricetown, BC. The bridge is located at mile 31.3
in the Bulkley Subdivision on the CN Mainline and
is an original bridge built somewhere between 1912 
and 1913. The photograph was taken from a side door 
in the vestibule of the Park Car on the Skeena 
Passenger Train heading west to Prince Rupert on
August 14, 2014.
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
Porphyry Creek 002 Another shot, zoomed in slight
ly more of the historic, curved trestle bridge over 
Porphyry Creek at mile 31.3 in the Bulkley Subdivision 
on the CN Mainline. Taken from the Skeena Passenger Train heading west to Prince Rupert on August 14, 2014.
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
the Seeley Gulch Bridge near New Hazelton, BC
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
When the Canadian Pacific Railway built along the Fraser River in the early-1800s, it chose the easiest route. 
Later, its rival, the Canadian Northern Railway (later Canadian National Railway) also wanted to build but 
couldn’t squeeze two sets of rail lines on the same side
of the Fraser Canyon and had to build on the other,
but trickier side.

Both  crossed the Fraser River at Cisco (proper name: Siska), about 9.5 miles south of Lytton BC on their own tracks. To do so, CN had to build a girder bridge but 
the railways co-operate and one railway runs on the 
other’s track when necessary. Between Basque
and Vancouver, there is "directional running"  where 
CP and CN cooperate, sending all westbound trains 
down CN tracks (and on the trestle) and all eastbound
trains on CP track. 

Eastbound on CP tracks now, our  Rocky Mountaineer 
train has already crossed the river first through a stone tunnel, then a squared-off black bridge and is now
ready to pass under the orange-pained 
CN girder bridge bound for an overnight stop at 
Kamloops, where Rocky Mountain passengers have 
been booked into local hotels before departure the 
next morning.

There is a splendid photo of both bridges in several resolutions at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Canadian_Pacific_
Railway_train_crossing_Fraser_River_on_Cisco
_bridge_at_Siska,_British_Columbia_(2010-Jun-13).jpg

The Canadian National bridge is a truss arch bridge, 247 metres (810 ft) long and 90 metres (300 ft) high. The north-west end of the bridge abuts into a near-vertical rock face. The south-east end of the bridge crosses the CPR tracks about 100 metres (330 ft) north of the CPR bridge. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cisco_Bridges
 
 

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A view from almost directly under the CN girder
bridge taken at At this point on the trip, the Rocky Mountaineer slows down to about 15 mph, to allow passengers a full view of the scenery, another
slowdown occurring  on top of the Stoney Creek
Bridge around Revelstoke and perhaps a few other 
notable sites, as time allows.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The top deck of the Stoney Creek Bridge, straddling the Beaver Canyon; in Glacier National Park, between Revelstoke and Golden BC

Its centre span is at the CPR Mile 76.2 Mountain Sub 
and the tracks are 300 feet (91 m) above the valley floor. 
The original wooden bridge was built in 1885, linking 
Calgary to Vancouver and in 1893, it became a steel structure. The bridge went through several
transformations, one of which was to add a second arch 
in 1929 and a walkway in 2001 (seen at the left).

This view is a from a video looking east from the rear platform of the Rocky Mountaineer train in May 2009.
View the complete sequence (interrupted by still shots
of the valley floor below) at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgxvzWFmnPE.

For a westbound video by someone else: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0E9toG-TZ8.  It is 
more direct into the bridge, and the train stops
momentarily on the deck.

Video capture:  Massey F. Jones
After crossing the CP Cantilever Bar Tunnel, passengers come upon this view of the CN Truss Arch Bridge
and Fraser River canyon as they are about to cross the
Cisco Bridge, barely seen in the lower right corner. 

While the Trans-Canada (#1 Highway) is about a 
kilometer to the right, the area is mainly inhospitable 
and home to the Siska First Nation, who have been 
there for thousands of years, living off salmon fishing 
and meager farming. Some live below the CPR bridge.

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
CPR 5821 leads an eastbound coal drag over the 
Revelstoke railway bridge over the Columbia River
in BC, summer 1975
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
This steel bridge is situated at the exit of the lower
portal of the lower spiral tunnel. Above the tunnel
portal is the upper track, barely seen through the
trees VIA 6407 is leading "The Canadian" west over 
the bridge, which  is the last step for trains within in
the spiral tunnels complex. Unfortunately, VIA 
ceased to go through the 
area in January 1990 and was replaced that summer,
by the Rocky Mountaineer; a private company 
operating luxury trains on a 2-day daulight-only trips. 
Photo taken in the late 1980s
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Although this isn't a "railway bridge" as such, this photo gives an excellent idea of most  Vancouver Skytrain guideways. Two tracks are in the guideway and all 
signalling is automatic. 
There is no operator on the trains. 
If something or someone falls on the tracks, all trains will stop automatically. This one is of the Metrotown Skytrain station in Burnaby, a Vancouver suburb, June 27th, 2007.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A view from inside the Vancouver Skytrain guideway. 
The bridge above is a road.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones

 
 
Some winter shots I took from the caboose of an
eastbound CPR freight in 1980, when I was set back
working as an engine service brakeman this view
shows the bridge over the Kicking Horse River
near field British Columbia.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
This picture shows our caboose on the bridge and the
lead units of our train emerging from Spiral Tunnel 
No.2 on Field Hill.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Looking westward at the bridge when our caboose had
emerged from the west portal of the Spiral Tunnel.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 82.2 Laggan Subdivision small bridge approaching 
Banff taken from the Canadian 1980
WP Bridge at Carcross YT, Aug 1982
This picture was taken and submitted by James Booth, Willingdon AB
The Grand Truck Pacific Bridge in Prince George, 
BC The bridge was built in 1914, a year before
Prince George was first incorporated. 
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
The Grand Truck Pacific Bridge in Prince George, BC 
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
The Grand Truck Pacific Bridge in Prince George, BC 
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
The Grand Truck Pacific Bridge in Prince George, BC 
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
The Grand Truck Pacific Bridge in Prince George, BC 
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
The Grand Truck Pacific Bridge in Prince George, BC 
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
BC Rail (CN Lease)  Quesnel River train bridge

There are two rail bridges over the Quesnel River, both in the city the river's named after. This bridge is both a bridge and an overpass across a stretch of road known as Johnson Loop. The bridge crosses the Quesnel River by its mouth with the Fraser River, BC's longest river entirely within BC. 

This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
BC Rail (CN Lease) Quesnel River train bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
BC Rail (CN Lease)  Quesnel River train bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
BC Rail (CN Lease)  Quesnel River train bridge. 
This is the second of the two bridges crossing this river 
at Quesnel, BC
This bridge serves the sawmills and pulp mills of Quesnel
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
CN Exchamsiks River Bridge
This bridge is at its mouth with the Skeena, the second longest river entirely within BC. The bridge is 50km 
west of Terrace and 90km east of Prince Rupert. 
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
CN Exchamsiks River Bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
CN Second Narrows Railway Bridge that goes across 
Burrard Inlet showing The Ironworkers Memorial Second Narrows Crossing behind it.
For more information on the  narrows bridge go to this site.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Narrows_Bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
CN Second Narrows Railway Bridge

The Second Narrows Bridge is a vertical lift railway 
bridge that crosses the Burrard Inlet and connects Vancouver with the North Shore. As the name suggests, 
it is located at the second narrowing of the Burrard Inlet.

This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
CN Second Narrows Railway Bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
CNR Hansard Rail Bridge
This bridge crosses the Fraser River between Upper Fraser and Sinclair Mills. Upper Fraser was a company town that Northwood Pulp and Timber closed in July 1999. Sinclair Mills is a small community, but still in existence. Until a few years ago, the road crossed over the bridge, sharing the same space that the railway traciks occupied. Traffic lights on either end of the bridge were controlled by men who worked in a booth on the bridge. It is now a rail only bridge. 
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
CNR Hansard Rail Bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
This is a railway bridge over a creek in the 
Fraser Canyon near Spences Bridge, visible from the 
Trans Canada Highway
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
The following series of four pictures shows the spring flooding in the
Prince George, BC area. They were submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
They were taken by his mother, Miriam Walker using an iPhone so the quality is not
as high as I would like but they do show the river in flood.This is during the spring 2012 flood, which saw the Skeena and Kalum Rivers reach their highest levels since 1972. 
The photos were taken on June 25
The bridge is on the CN mainline between Jasper and
Prince Rupert, over the Zymacord River in the 
community of New Remo. The Zymacord is a tributary
of the Skeena River, and is located about 15 minutes
west of Terrace, BC. The photo was taken on
June 25, 2012 at the height of the spring 2012 flood, 
during which river levels were higher than they'd been 
since 1972.
This picture was submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
CN Bridge over the Skeena River on the branch line to Kitimat, just west of the Terrace, BC CN Yards. 
This picture was submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC 
CN bridge over the Kalum River at its mouth with the Skeena River on the mainline to Prince Rupert.
The Kalum River forms the western boundary of the 
City of Terrace and the eastern boundary of the Kitsumkalum First Nations Reserve, that the river takes
it name from. This is during the spring 2012 flood, which 
saw the Skeena and Kalum Rivers reach their highest
levels since 1972. The photo was taken on June 25
This picture was submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC 
CN train just west of Terrace heading to Prince Rupert
at the height of the spring 2012 flood, 
This picture was submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC 
The  BC Rail footbridges over railway tracks  over the
tracks in Quesnel, quite close to the former BCR Station. The bridge is a concrete spiral beside what was once an active railway crossing. The crossing is only open now in
the spring when Johnson Loop is flooded. When open, the crossing provides direct access to the Johnson Bridge
across the Quesnel River into Johnson Subdivision 
(the subdivision where the caboose is located 
and found on the Caboose page).
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
The  BC Rail footbridges over railway tracks  over the
tracks in Quesnel,
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
The  BC Rail footbridges over railway tracks  over the
tracks in Quesnel,
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
The  BC Rail footbridges over railway tracks  over the
tracks in Quesnel,
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
The remains of the rail bridge truss (span4) from the E&N station end in June 2012, with the bridge on the left still handling traffic. Future plans call for building a new bridge 
by 2016; to the left of the old one,  which will then be removed. 

It will be a bascule geared design and not fitted with rail. http://www.johnsonstreetbridge.com/the-project/design/

A three-quarter view of the Johnson Street Bridge in June 2012, with the rail span now removed. The station was located on the left side in the photo. On Friday, February 24 2011, the largest single-lift crane barge in Western Canada lifted the rail portion of the 88 year old bridge and its 500 (metric) tonne counterweight (about 551.3 US tons) its foundation,  lowered the load onto the barge and it was floated away to be scrapped due to severe corrosion. http://www.vancouversun.com/news/thewest/Barge+arrival
+begins+Johnson+Street+Bridge/6191054/story.html.
Anyone interested in a complete assessment of the Johnson Street Bridge for heritage value can visit: johnsonstreetbridge.org/pdf/kalmanreport.pdf
The report contains several engineering and historical photographs.

The large building in the background is the 
Delta Victoria Hotel.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A scan from a colour negative taken by a friend, brought 
out an early 1970s view of the Johnson Bridge with both spans in place and an E&N train running on the bridge, northbound out of Victoria City Centre. 
This picture was submitted by Massey F. Jones and is part of 
the Massey F. Jones Collection
A view from the eastbound Rocky Mountaineer; 
showing part of the century-old New Westminster
swing bridge in the foreground, spanning the south 
shore of the Fraser River at New Westminster and
the north shore at Surrey BC. In the next few minutes, 
our train will turn left and ride on it.

The New Westminster Bridge was constructed in 1904
and originally built with two decks. The lower deck
was used for rail traffic, and the upper deck was used
for automobile traffic. With the opening of the 
Pattullo Bridge in 1937, the upper deck was removed
and the bridge was converted exclusively for rail use. 

It is owned and operated by the BNSF Railway, while
the Canadian National Railway has trackage rights as
do VIA Rail and AMTRAK.  For about the first 50 miles
in and out of Vancouver, the Rocky Mountaineer uses
CN trackage. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Westminster_Bridge

The Patullo Bridge in the background was named in
honour of Thomas Dufferin Pattullo, former premier
of British Columbia. Both bridges are now up for 
discussion on their replacement. 

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones

 
The following series of drawings for the CN  Fraser River Bridge were submitted
by James Booth, Willingdon AB

 
Dwg Title Block
Bridge History
First Span South of the New Westminster BC Bridge
First Two Spans of the South Side of the Swing Span
2nd Span South of the New Westminster Bridge
Swing Span of the Bridge
Swing Span of the Bridge (Plan View)
2nd Two Spans South of the Swing Span
Port Mann End of the Bridge
Port Mann End of the Bridge (Plan View)
New Westminster end of bridge (plan view)
New Westminster end of bridge 
(plan view) showing station location

This was a GN ( BNSF) station. It is long gone, as is the roadway that was on the bridge.
Along with CN, SRY, BNSF still uses the bridge & it’s current station is located West of the bridge.
 

CP Roseberry Landing, Oct 1981
This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Booth, Willingdon AB
Skeena Crossing CN Bridge
Corey took these pictures from a moving train.
The bridge is on the CN mainline to Prince Rupert, and the train was Via Rail's Skeena train, running from Jasper to Prince Rupert. 
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
Skeena Crossing CN Bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
Skeena Crossing CN Bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
The BC Forest Discovery Centre in Duncan BC
features a trestle over Somenos Lake (a wetland). 
The 100 acre (40 ha) site features 2.5 km of track on
which a 36" (914 mm) gauge railway is operated for
visitors in season. http://enertelligence.com/bcforestdiscoverycentre
/wordpress/?page_id=179

The locomotive is Cowichan Valley #25.

Massey F. Jones collection

 
BC Highway Landmarks
This section has been written to show what I refer to as Highway landmarks. These landmarks are associated with a railway and in most cases have greatly improved the highway near a rail line or in some cases are just simply very nice to look at.
A view from the Rocky Mountaineer train during the afternoon of May 11th, 2009 of the new  405-metre-long 
Park Bridge, between Golden and Yoho Park (site of the Spiral Tunnels)

The bridge, which runs 90 metres above the Kicking Horse River and  its approaches, which cost $130 million to construct,  now prevent many fatal accidents which 
happened in this area every year, on the twisting and
turning “Ten Mile Hill”, of the Trans-Canada Highway, 
east of Golden BC . 

Up to when they built this bridge, people who used the Trans Canada couldn’t stop fast enough as they were going
downhill through the “7 mile hill’ and the “10 mile hill”.
Consequently, the people going too fast downhill, collided with the cars lumbering uphill. Guess the rest.
Or going downhill and around the curves there, would 
slide on bald tires down the hill and hit the rocks on each
side of the highway.
This highway is  it’s used by approximately 150,000 
vehicles per day.
You can take a ride on the hill at: 
Ten Mile Hill on the TransCanada

A drive down the newly opened Ten Mile Hill divided freeway portion of the TransCanada highway in the
Kicking Horse Canyon area east of Golden, British Columbia, Canada. This project represents a massive upgrade to the old 2 lane road that was both extremely 
slow and dangerous and includes the new Park Bridge.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dF0fZTzRPTE

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A closer view as we are about to pass under. 

Notice the Trans-Canada Highway to the left.

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
An old stone bridge in Albert Canyon, east of Revelstoke BC, probably dating back to the late-1880s when the CPR pushed West.
Because of the heavy tonnage today, a new track was laid and this well maintained roadway is now most probably a mountain hiking trail.
This view was taken from the Rocky Mountaineer on
May 11th, 2009.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The Trans Canada Highway bridge near Malakwa BC, 
about 10 minutes by rail from Revelstoke BC on 
May 11th, 2009.
It is one of the rare commercial traffic bridges in this mountainous area.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The attraction is the CN tunnel in the background,
at Hell's Gate BC, so named because the Fraser River narrows to a mere a passage only 35 metres (115 ft.) 
wide at that point but the pedestrian footbridge is also interesting. Prior to the railway’s arrival,
Hell's Gate was an active aboriginal fishing area,
located about 130 miles from Vancouver,
just south of Boston Bar (for CN) or North Bend, almost across the river, for CP. Both are divisional points
for their railway. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hells_Gate
_(British_Columbia)

In the 1880s the CPR built a transcontinental track 
that passed along the bank at Hell's Gate, and in 1911
the CNR began constructing a second track across the
river. In 1914 a large rockslide triggered by CNR construction fell into the river (view the debris), 
obstructing the passage of Pacific salmon needing 
to swim upstream to spawn. Eventually, "fish ladders"
were constructed, seen below the bridge about the
centre of the picture (the L shaped structure).  The suspension bridge allows pedestrians across in season
but a better way to do it is to use the Hell’s Gate
Airtram, in the sky at top left. http://www.hellsgateairtram.com/ Several visitor photos
of the facilities exist at Google Images. 

This view was taken from the Rocky Mountaineer
Gold Leaf dome at 12:55pm on May 10th, 2009,
eastbound from Vancouver to Calgary, with an 
overnight stop in Kamloops, BC. 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones

 
Links
Visit our Home in Summerville Nova Scotia. This house was built in 1873.
Where we live and what we do
A Nova Scotia Snow Storm Hits Summerville
A Nova Scotia Snow Storm Hits Summerville
The Halifax & South-Western Museum
A tribute to the Steam Locomotives of the CNR
A tribute to the Steam Locomotives of the CPR
Robot Cars
The Old Railway Stations of Canada
Electric Locomotives and Street Cars
The Newfoundland Railway
Industrial and on Site Diesel  Locomotives
Canadian Railway Artifacts
Old Canadian Diesels
   
Old Canadian Rolling Stock Passenger Cars
Old Canadian Rolling Stock Freight Cars
The Scrap Yard
Canadian Old Logging Equipment
and Steam and Diesel Locomotives
The Grain Elevators of Western Canada
Canadian National Railways Motive Power Statistics Index
Railway Maintenance Equipment
And Old Railway Rolling Stock
Canadian Railway Tunnels with a detailed look
at the CPR Spiral Tunnels
Jerry Barnes' Garden Railway, The SCRR
The Nova Scotia Railway Heritage Society
The Nova Scotia Railway Heritage Society
Historic Aircraft Pictures
Visit John's Old Car and Truck Pictures
The Yard Limit's page on the
Windsor & Hantsport Railway (WHRC)
CN Pensioners' Association
The Stanley Steamer

For all you steam fans, this page is a must

Visit Lonnie Hedgepeth's 
of Rocky Mount, North Carolina site.
He has used the plans provided on Covered Bridge Plans  webpage and is building a Covered Bridge for his
Live Steam train.
The building trades class at Darlington HS in Darlington, Wisconsin built this covered bridge for a local business man
 Tour the 64 remaining Covered Bridges of New Brunswick
The Covered Bridges that once dotted Nova Scotia.
Lilies From the Valley
A Vast selection of Oriental and Asiatic previously cut commercially grown bulbs ready for shipment anywhere in Canada
Visit my Jeep page
A Picture Review of the Jeeps from 1940 to the present
A Picture Review of the
Nash, Hudson 
and the cars of American Motors
A Picture Review of the Hudsons and Terraplanes
that were found in Australia
A Picture Review Studebaker
A Picture review of the Packard
A Picture Review of the Pickup Truck from 1940 to 1969
A Picture review of the Volkswagen
A Picture Review of the Kaiser Frazer
A Picture Tour of the
A Picture Review of the Henry J
A Picture Review of the Crosley
A Picture Review of the Chevrolet from 1916 tto 1970
A Picture Review of the Ford from 1908 to 1969
The Chrysler Airflow
View some of John Evan's  Artwork
View some of
John' Evan's Artwork
This site has quite a collections 
of John's artwork.
View these old cars as you haven't before.
Eric Gordon's Kaiser Rebuild
There are many pictures showing the details of this Rebuild
E Mail

 
 
 
 


 

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