Canadian Train Bridges and Trestles
Quebec and Ontario



 
I decided to write this page on railway bridges after a visitor Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba offered to give me a number of railway bridge pictures that he had collected.
I again hope that my visitors will be sending me their pictures to be
included on this page. 
 
 
 

 

 
The Maritimes
Western Canada
British Columbia and the Territories

 
Return to Train Bridges and Trestles
The Halifax & South-Western Museum


Quebec

The Harstone trestle is being studied for removal, replacement or refurbishment. This bridge, constructed in 1922, is one of the few remaining traces of the historic Port Arthur, Duluth and Western (Pee Dee) Railway. The replacement of the bridge would mean the loss of an important piece 
of the history of the area.


 

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This view, dated June 1974  shows a couple of diesels providing the link between Montréal and Chicoutimi, about 140 miles north of Québec in the region now called Ville de Saguenay, now composed of the former towns of Jonquière, Chicoutimi and La Baie.

CN and then VIA provided service dating back to almost 
the beginning of the 20th Century, until 1987, when VIA closed the downtown Chicoutimi station (see my station page).

The Rivière Chicoutimi flows under the bridge, providing hydroelectric power,  specifically for smelting aluminum at the former ALCAN (now Rio Tinto) plant in the Arvida district of Jonquière (home to the Roberval Saguenay Railway - mfj). The area pictured is the outlet into the Rivière Saguenay about a mile away.

In July 1996, one of the many dams burst, sending 11
times its usual flow into the basin and flooding the entire
area http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saguenay_Flood but the 
old bridge survived and was turned into a bicycle path
during reconstruction.

Montréal - Chicoutimi in the 1970s, was a lonely 318-mile ride with only day coach seating and no diner, as the train traversed a provincial park for at least 200 miles. The
same trip is still done by VIA but the rails now end at Jonquière, about 10 kilometres (16 miles) short of Chicoutimi. View the timetable elsewhere in the page.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
"du Milieu" river trestle. Gaétan  took the picture on
23 March 2005.  It is located 40 km south of La Tuque.
From Via Rail literature, it's the highest in Québec 
at 60 m, 121 m long and built in 1907
This picture was taken and submitted by Gaétan Gagnon
Roberval Saguenay and RS3 locomotive cross a 
concrete bridge over a small set of falls, near 
Chicoutimi QC (now Saguenay) in the late 70s, outbound 
with aluminum ore (bauxite) from their dock at 
Grande Baie (Port Alfred)
to the smelter at Arvida on one of their frequent runs.
The bridge replaced an adjacent almost centenary wood 
bridge which had rotted.

Like all the locomotives on its roster up to about the early
90s, Roberval Saguenay Railway motive power was  built
by either ALCO or their Canadian subsidiary Montreal Locomotive Works. The #24 was built as a Model RS-18 
by Montreal Locomotive Works in April 1960
(Ser # 83278) and spent its entire life on the RSR, 
before being sold to a local metals dealer for either
sale or scrap in 2000. 

 

Massey F. Jones collection

The Roberval Saguenay concrete bridge, probably
constructed in the 1950s; when the deck of the old
structure partly seen under the arch, became 
inadequate to support heavier loads. 
This view dates from around 1980.
The advantage of this type of bridge is that it is
extremely solid and requires low maintenance. 
Note the very heavy and reinforced bridge abutment.
The surrounding rock is granite.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The old bridge in the foreground might have been
constructed as early as 1909, when the Ha!-Ha!
Bay Railway Company was formed; the ancestor 
of the present Roberval Saguenay Railway  http://www.trainweb.org/oldtimetrains/RS/history.htm 

It originally carried steam locomotives and  possibly
linked by rail with another bridge (featured on this
page) in the Chicoutimi Basin, where a pulp mill
operated , ferrying pulp from the Chicoutimi mill to
La Baie, about 20 miles away, using among others
0-4-0 Tank Locomotive 15, featured at http://yourrailwaypictures.com/Logging/ 

In 1925, Alcan opened an aluminum plant in the area,
purchased the RSR and extended the track from Arvida 
(now Saguenay) to the deep water port at La Baie, now transporting bauxite ore. All through the war years, the
bridge supported steam locomotives and their load, till 
the advent of heavy road diesels, at which time the 
structure was probably no longer considered safe and the adjacent concrete bridge was built and is still in daily use.

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones

Ste Ursule Falls trestle QC with CN 6060 crossing on a runpast, during a railfan trip with the St Lawrence Valley Chapter of the Canadian Railroad Historical Association (CRHA) in the mid-70s.

Situated in the Mauricie area of Quebec close to 
Shawinigan, the trestle still supports between 5 to 10 
trains a day (mostly freight but some VIA) between
Montreal and the Saguenay/Lac St-Jean or 
Abitibi regions through the Garneau Yard 
(Triage Garneau). Magnification of a crossbuck near 
there on Google Street View, has put the area around 
MP 75.83 CN Joliette Sub. 

Built  by The Grand Trunk Railway (CN precursor) in 
1900, it was the longest bridge in Canada in its time, with 
a deck measuring 346 m (1135 ft.), which is the length 
of 3 olympic soccer fields. The elevation at the deepest 
in the valley stands at 56.4 m (185 ft.), 
which is the equivalent of about a 15-story building.

While the bridge is off-limits to pedestrians, the area 
offers interpretive hiking trails as well as other winter
and summer activities. http://www.mauricie-travelguide.com/maskinonge/parc-
des-chute-ste-ursule/
 
 

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Bristol Mines Trestle, 1982 It is on a siding to
Bristol Mines at Wyman Quebec
This picture was submitted by Bill Erwin
These Dayliners are shown on one of the bridges out of Montreal's West Island and are ancestors of the present 
AMT Montreal-Rigaud service.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A CN passenger train passes over this Lachine Canal in downtown Montreal, minutes before entering into 
Central Station/Gare Centrale  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Station_(Montreal)
where all VIA Rail trains now arrive and depart. 
The metal structures (since removed), were used to 
support the catenary for early operation of CN electric
engines operating through the Mount Royal Tunnel on 
the other side of the station. 
This was one of their storage area. 

This large heavy bridge is an upgrade from the
decades-old swing bridge behind the engine, briefly 
featured in the 1965 National Film Board movie 
"The Railrodder" as Buster Keaton makes a symbolic
entry in the Montreal area within the movie, on the
way to the West Coast.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EiqqxyZeDXoas

All  the area under the bridges has now been reclaimed
into green space and integrated into the Lachine Canal 
National Historic Site.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lachine_Canal

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
CN Geeps 4101 and 4105 on a runpast in front of 
Montmorency Falls during a St Lawrence Valley
Railway Society CRHA excursion in the late 1970s
Located just a few minutes from downtown Quebec City, 
half times higher than Niagara Falls and 150ft (45.7m)
wide. The falls flow into the St Lawrence River.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A  CHRA fantrip brought Montreal railfans to the Cap Rouge trestle near Quebec City during summer 1978. 
Visible in the background is the Pont de Québec /Quebec Bridge (combined road/rail bridge) and Pont Pierre 
Laporte (the white pillars), a vehicle bridge.

The Cap Rouge Trestle (translated to Red Cape 
[as for marine geography], is the main attraction in the 
area which dates back to 1635. Locally, it is called 
"Le Tracel". Built in 1907-1908 with the participation 
of Gustave Eiffel,  the structure was constructed by the National Transcontinental Railway (NTR), to link 
Winnipeg, Manitoba to Moncton, New Brunswick.

When the NTR became absorbed in the Canadian
National System in 1920, the Cap Rouge Trestle 
became CNR property and still in steady use today.
It spans 3,335 feet (about 1.1 km), with an average
of 172 feet (about 53 m) above ground.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The name plate for the bridge shown below

The date sign over the bridge reads:
"1887 DOMINION BRIDGE CO., LIM'D 
LACHINE, PROV. QUE. "

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones

 

This view was taken through the front cab of an
RDC during  a railway fantrip in the mid 70s. 
Our train is about to pass through an old iron bridge 
at Fort Coulonge QC (west of Ottawa in Pontiac County)
and will let us out on the other side while the train backs
up for a runpast on the bridge. That's when it goes full 
speed in front of the crowd,  with all bells and whistles going. 
Fans take pictures, video; some record the sound, others
just look. Then everyone re-board and makes ready for the 
next runpast at another historical place where it's safe for
for all to stand trackside.

This old iron truss railway bridge carried the Pontiac Pacific Junction railway over the Coulonge River until 1902, and then the CPR until 1978. 
Our fantrip was designed solely to explore that soon-to-be abandoned line.
The tracks have now been removed and the bridge 
converted into a hiking and cycling trail. See the links 
below for pictures and more info.

The date sign over the bridge reads: 
1887 DOMINION BRIDGE CO., LIM'D
LACHINE, PROV. QUE.

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM9N5V_
Fort_Coulonge_Rail_Bridge

http://www.canadatrails.ca/tct/qc/pontiac.html

http://www.canadatrails.ca/tct/qc/pontiac.html

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Dayliner CP 9064 almost at the end of a runpast on the
Fort Coulonge Bridge during a St. Lawrence Valley 
(CRHA) fantrip during the mid-70s. Shortly thereafter, 
the line was due to be abandoned by CP. The purpose of
the fantrip was to have a ride on a line before the rail was torn up. 

Fort Coulonge is named after Nicholas d'Ailleboust, Sieur 
de Coulonge, who formed a settlement near there in 
1694-95. It eventually became a Hudson's Bay trading
post on the Ottawa River and most of the area was 
developed in the mid-1800s, including the bridge, which 
was installed in 1887. At one time, Fort Coulonge was the
site of a large sawmill, due to the large amount of forest around and gave rise to folk tales about those famous Canadian lumberjacks, kept alive at the nearby Chute Coulonge (Coulonge Falls) http://www.chutescoulonge.qc.ca/trails_6.htm . A map 
on the link will give the location of nearby Fort Coulonge.

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A CNR Steamer crossing the  Richelieu River.
This picture was taken from ther west side of the river and the train has just left Beloeil and is heading east, mid 1940s
This picture was submitted by Norman Baker, Kingston ON
A CNR Steamer crossing the Richelieu River
heading east. The picture was tas taken from the
beach at Otterburn Park on the east side of the river,
The train has just left Beloeil, 1953
This picture was submitted by Norman Baker, Kingston ON
One of the VIA FPA-4 diesel in the 6700 series, alongside Boulevard Laurier, exiting the Quebec Bridge
(Pont de Quebec) on a very rainy day in the very
early 80s; outbound from Montreal, into Gare du Palais 
in downtown Quebec, on the still popular VIA "Corridor".

Seeking to compete with GMD for the passenger loco
market, Montreal Locomotive Works produced the FPA-2 
and FPA-4 units but only CN received the latter. These 
units went to VIA Rail and all were retired by 1989.
A few were preserved in Canada but the bulk was sold
to US operators for use in tourist operations including 
dinner trains.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Alco PA-1s 17 and 19, lead the Delaware & Hudson's Laurentian between New York City and Montreal,
inbound into Montreal around St. Lambert QC, having
just passed the locks on the St. Lawrence Seaway. 
The PA-1 is the most famous model in American
railroad history. Notice the long nose.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The south end of Victoria Bridge at St. Lambert, 
July 1974. The raised span of the bridge and the
road gate to the right in the down position, indicate
that a ship is somewhere in the vicinity through
St. Lawrence Seaway. Built in 1859 to link 
Montreal and the South Shore, Victoria Bridge is 
still very much in use by road and rail today. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Bridge_(Montreal)

Further to the left in the photo is the St. Lambert
Diversion, added in 1958, so that CN trains are not
held up by ships. It also features a road for vehicles.
When the span is raised on the main bridge as above,
the diversion becomes available for continuous 
operation and vice versa. The link to a 1959
aerial picture for CN, shows the layout very well. http://www.imagescn.technomuses.ca/structures/index
_choice.cfm?id=36&photoid=45286746
Also view the map below

At one time, Victoria Bridge hosted tracks of the
Montreal & Southern Counties Railways, an electric interurban streetcar operation between downtown
Montreal and the South Shore owned by private 
concerns until 1920, when the M&SC became a part 
of Canadian National Railways and it continued 
running the streetcar parallel to its CNR mainline
between Montreal and Halifax. 

While service was frequent, the M&SC, with their early-1900 
era brown streetcars and neglected maintenance had 
become a money-loser, so starting about 1951; CNR gradually cut back operations after 47 years. 
On Sunday June 19, 1955; the last M&SC streetcar
made its last trip on Victoria Bridge.  In 1956, the tracks were removed and the roadway to the right of this
picture was in use. 

While the equipment was very outdated, M&SC 
operated a fairly efficient operation in its time, 
transporting commuters from Montreal's business 
section to outlying areas, not yet considered
the bedroom communities that they are today.
View the M&SC history at: http://www.r2parks.net/M&SC.html 
and 
http://www.trainweb.org/elso/msc.htm

Also compare the web photo of the first M&SC trip on 
30 October 1909 below, with the view on this page, taken 
almost from the exact spot 65 years later.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:RailTram_19091030
MSC_PremierTramArriveASt-Lambert.jpg

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A portion from  a French copy of Perly's 1983 map book,  showing the south end of Victoria Bridge and  the St. Lambert Diversion. 
http://www.perlys.com/oms-tour.php
Submitted by Massey F. Jones
A Google Earth view of the main CN alignment
(straight line) and the diversion (curved).
Both bridges are able to accommodate road and rail 
traffic.
View an extensive history of Victoria Bridge in English,
including several old time photos at: http://www.memorablemontreal.com/accessibleQA/en
/bridges/?id=176&menu=histoire
Google earth Image submitted by Massey F. Jones

Ontario


Alvinston Bridge
Jim had this to say about this picture.
"This is only the second photograph of the bridge that I have
found. It is nice and clear and shows the steel construction. 
Judging by the dress - particularly of the girl and her hair style,
I would suggest it is 
from the 1920's or 1930's.  When I was a kid I always thought it 
would be cool to climb up on some of those style girders, but I 
never had enough nerve!
The photo came from a lady who lived at Gray's Siding, just
about 2 miles from the bridge. 
The line was the GTR Kingscourt cutoff which ran
from Glencoe, through Alvinston to Kingscourt on the line from
Sarnia to London. The line was abandoned and the bridge
removed in the late 1960's."
 This picture was submitted by Jim Griffin, Markdale ON
CNR Kingscourt Branch Bridge near Alvinston, ON.

It was built 1898 and was taken down in 1965
The bridge is on the line from Alvinston to Glencoe
and goes over the Sydenham River - but according to employee 
timetables it was called Bear Creek Bridge.
It was 680' long made up of 30' deck girder sections on 
bents that were supported by cut stone footings that are 
still in place.  The bridge also included a 90' truss
section that went over the river.  Only one of the 
river piers is still in place.

 This picture was submitted by Jim Griffin, Markdale ON
GTR Bridge Paisley, ON
This picture was submitted by Jim Griffin, Markdale ON
GTR Bridge Paisley, ON
This picture was submitted by Jim Griffin, Markdale ON
GTR Bridge Paisley, ON
This picture was submitted by Jim Griffin, Markdale ON
GTR Bridge Uxbridge, Ontario. 
The picture was taken in 1886 by local photographer, 
A. J. Lord. The blur of a train can be seen crossing
the bridge.This bridge still exists although the tracks 
here have been removed. 
The bridge crossed a creek and mill pond, and was 
known as the "Big Bridge" or "Big B," especially 
by those who went there to swim.
An important fact today is that the Trans Canada 
Trail enters Uxbridge from the east on the former
railway right-of-way, and crosses over this bridge
which is just east of Main Street 
North. Allan McGillivray, Uxbridge Twp. historian.

The Toronto and Nipissing Railway originally built 
a 3 ft 6 in(1,067 mm) narrow gauge line in the
late 1860's, with service between Toronto and Uxbridge 
 

Thgis picture was taken by local local photographer of the day , A. J. Lord and was submitted by Allan McGillivray, Uxbridge Twp. historian.
Canadian Pacific steamer pulling freight on the line
from Coldwater, Ontario across the Hogg's Bay Trestle
or Hogg's Bay Trestle (1908 to 1978} into Port McNicoll's 
grain elevators in the 1960's

The Hogg’s Bay Trestle was built in 1908 to service the Canadian Pacific Railway line when it moved its
terminal to Port McNicoll. 
It spanned a swampy 2,141 feet across the bay and 
was the longest wooden trestle of its kind in Canada. 
Built by a local craftsman, Mike McPeake, it was an engineering marvel. This rail line saved much time 
for trains running to and from Port McNicoll and 
helped it to become the thriving community once 
known as the “Chicago of the North”. The trestle
was so important to Port McNicoll and even Canada 
that during World War II it was watched by armed
guards. Sadly, the trestle was dismantled in 1978
due to concerns of safety and costly maintenance

This picture was submitted by Doug Binns, Coldwater, Ontario
The scar at the bottom right of this Google Earth 
satellite picture gives a fairly good idea of how the
track led to the dock on the Hoggs trestle at
Port McNicoll. Follow it from the right side through the
water and into the dock on the left picture. The right picture
shows the trails now present around the trestle;  the curved
one about centre, is named "Trestle Trail". Hogg Bay is 
an arm of Georgian Bay that some name "Hog Bay" today. 
Coldwater described in another photo, is about half-way 
between Port McNicoll and Orillia. See my station page to
find out more about Port McNicoll
Submitted by Massey F. Jones
An entrance to the Tay Shore Trail on Hwy 12 from Orillia 
to Midland, brings visitors to the main pier on the shore, 
which formerly anchored the Hoggs Bay trestle. A further 
walk left along the trail towards Port McNicoll brings
hikers into what is called "The Trestle Trail" portion. 
The Tay Shore Trail is a 17 km of abandoned CN rail 
corridor. It is part of the Trans-Canada Trail.

This Google Street View looks northwest.

Submitted by Massey F. Jones
CPR Train Bridge at  Kenora ON

CPR bridge spanning the Winnipeg River at Kenora ON.
This is the main line of the CPR connecting eastern and
western Canada. 

This picture was taken and submitted by Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba
CPR Train Bridge at Nipigon ON

CPR bridge spanning the Nipigon River at Nipigon ON. 
This is on the main line of the CPR.

This picture was taken and submitted by Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba
The South Nation River train bridge at 
Casselman ON 
This is on the CN Alexandria sub between Casselman
and Ottawa

Shown crossing the bridge is CN's "Budd" Geometry Test Car 1501 enroute to Arnprior.

This picture was taken by Ray Farand and was submitted by Jean Guy Hamel
CP Maitland River Train Bridge, Goderich, ON 
with CP-4244 and 4242 crossing
This picture was taken by Bill Thomson in June 1, 1984.
It was submitted by Jean Guy Hamel
CNR Bridge Gravenhurst Ont. April 1973
This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Parker
Ottawa Central Rideau River Bridge
This picture was submitted by Jean Guy Hamel
CPR Bridge across the mouth of the Moira River
in Belleville Ontario
This picture was submitted by L. Bruce Polmanter, Belleville, Ontario
CPR Bridge across the mouth of the Moira River in Belleville Ontario
This picture was submitted by L. Bruce Polmanter, Belleville, Ontario
CNR Bridge across the Moira River in Belleville Ontario
This picture was submitted by L. Bruce Polmanter, Belleville, Ontario
CNR Bridge across the Moira River in Belleville Ontario
This picture was submitted by L. Bruce Polmanter, Belleville, Ontario
An Essex Terminal Railway (ETR) diesel locomotive 
crossing the steel bridge over the Canadian Southern 
Railway (CASO) tunnel, around 1975. Built almost a century ago, the tunnel has been  used by the Michican Central Railroad , New York Central and its successors Penn Centraland Conrail to ferry freight betweenWindsor and Detroit. It  continues to be used today to ferrygoods between Canada and the US and the bridge continuesto be in almost daily use  by the ETR,  linking theirOjibway Yard, and the  interchange to CN and CP in Windsor.

To view a CP train exiting  the CASO tunnel, go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCdsNefVuaI
The end of the movie clip will also show the location 
from which the photo on this page was taken.
YouTube  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cvv3_AmusCU&feature
=related is taken from the same location; a more modern ETS diesel, crossing the bridge.
 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The Bathurst Street bridge is one of the choicest places from observing lots of rail in Toronto.
Located within the downtown core, this unassuming streetcar bridge that has been there for decades.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bathurst_Street_Bridge

I took this Kodachrome shot for myself in the 1970s or so, while on a mission to photograph for CNE planning (flypasts, paratroop) by the military. (Actually, it's possible to get just about the same thing from the CN Tower, which we circled many times)

The tracks on the bottom left,  lead to the CP John Street Roundhouse, while those on the lower right go to CN Spadina Roundhouse. 
Notice the many green GO Transit "F" units on the (then newly-laid) tracks. Only the John Street Rounhouse remains today as a living reminder of years past.

The scene changed a lot over the next 20 years.
Yet to be constructed in the lower left portion is the Skydome (later Rogers Centre) and others.
Immediately to the left of the Barhurst bridge is Old Fort York and the Gardiner Expressway. 
In the background is Lake Ontario and Toronto Island, 
Rails to the top left go to Hamilton and Niagara Falls, while those the top right connect with Northern Ontario destinations and the Canadian West

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The Bathurst Bridge shown from track level, taken fron the front of a Dayliner, heading into Union Station.
The VIA passenger cars in Spadina Yard would date this photo about 1978, when VIA Rail was formed.
In the background, behind the coaling tower is the Spadina Avenue Bridge. Also seen in the background is the CN Tower.  Yet to be built (in 1989) is the Skydome (later Rogers Centre).

Special features of the photo include a very clear view of the turnouts (switch) alignment, period boxcars and the CN Spadina Roundhouse on the right side (notice the red nosed yard switchers.
Also notice the control tower in the background and some kind of control shack in the foreground, topped by a loudspeaker.

Above the bridge and intersecting the CN Tower are barely visible "telltales". A tell-tale is  a series of ropes suspended over the tracks above the height of a boxcar.
These ropes are intended to give warning to a brakeman on the roof of the train that the train is approaching a low-clearance obstacle, such as a tunnel or a bridge.

My research established that the first Canadian Light Rail Vehicles (CLRV) were intoduced on the TTC in 1979 and this would be one of the early ones. As this  is a scan from
a negative, the date is undetermined but it is before the era of the articulated TTC streetcars (ALRV) streeetcars, now in wide use, so we can make the photo about 1979-1980.

We are about to leave the Toronto Terminals Railway tracks and proceed on the mainline. In the aerial photo, this would be about  the centre of the photo, alongside Old Fort York.
View Toronto Terminals Railway at: http://www.ttrly.com/

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The CN Spadina Yard, still in full operation May 1980 in
a view feom the Spadina Avenue Bridge.. 
Built in the 1920s as a servicing and repair facility, the
yard was razed in 1986 and replaced by the Rogers Center (formerly The Skydome).

While steam has been gone for the past 20 years or so, coaling towers still stand at the centre of the photo.
The diesels are an FP7 (or FP9) on the right and an 
FPA-4 on the left. as well as an RDC.
To the very far left is the CN Tower, then only 4 years old.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The  CN Spadina Roundhouse, taken from the CN Tower
in the early 80s
Nothing is left of roundhouse or yard, which was leveled 
in 1986 to make way for the Rogers Centre
(formerly The Skydome).

The Spadina Avenue bridge is at the top of the photo. 
A view of the Spadina Yard from a bridge is in these pages. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CNR_Spadina_Roundhouse

Still preserved in the back of the CN Tower is a portion 
of CPR John Street Roundhouse, open to the public.
http://www.trha.ca/johnstreet.html

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A lashup of Geeps 4925, 4924 and 4928 in the 
High Bridge in Georgia,  Vermont in the mid 70s, during a fantrip with the St Lawrence Valley Railway Society (CRHA). 
The units are now heading back to Montreal with us.
Georgia is just south of St Albans VT, a few miles beyond 
the Canadian border.

The bridge is about 700 ft long and spans the
Lamoille River. As in other Vermont bridges, this one 
dates back to the late 1800s. 
It first had had 2stone pillars, since reinforced with 2 extra concrete pillars to handle heavier traffic. Some of the original  pillars can be seen, one to the left and one in the center of the photo. A very early stereo tintype shows the bridge with its original pillars and stone archways at:
 http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons
(The 2 pictures were printed side by side on cardboard and 
viewed by both eyes through different lenses, giving the 
illusion of depth  - the ancestor of the Viewmaster - mfj)

A good description of the bridge and its geographical location 
is at: http://www.waymarking.com/
Newer units on the bridge at http://www.railroad.net/articles/columns/reviews/

The bridge is still used daily by Amtrak's Vermonter,
running daily between Washington, DC and St. Albans, in Northern Vermont. 

Central Vermont was a subsidiary of the CN and it has a convulated history dating back to the late 1800s, with 
several receiverships along the way before CN purchased
it, then sold it to Rail America, who has maintained operations over the bridge since. More at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Vermont_Railway

Jeff Colburn made the following comments on this bridge.
"The reason that there are 2 stone abutments is that the bridge used to be a wooden lattice bridge with a 125 foot
span (3) hence the two stone piers. When the bridge was converted to steel girders, the girders used were approximately 60 foot spans, thus the need for additional piers between the stone piers. If you look closely at the
stone piers you can see the concrete cap to make up the difference in the depth of the wooden trusses and the steel girders. There are actually several examples of this type 
of replacement construction in Vt."
 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The slide caption, mentions that this pair of CP RDCs
are northbound to Toronto-Havelock in June 1980.

While the destination of the train is unclear, research
has now confirmed that this photo was taken from 
stairs leading into the E.T. Seaton Park; off
Eglinton Avenue near Don Mills Road and the 
Ontario Science Centre.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The small foot bridge in the middle of this screen, 
captured from a 2015 Google Earth Street View 
of the parking lot at the E.T. Seton park, firmly
confirms the trestle location.
Credit: Google Earth Street View (portion)
In a runpast, most passenger are off-loaded at a picturesque
spot, the train backs up about a mile, then rolls past the spectators, who then reboard the train after the run.
The practice  isn't done much anymore, due to insurance 
concerns and the high price of fuel.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Midland Ontario line (abandoned in the late 1990s) 
trestle near Saint Marie Ontario at Saint Marie Amongst 
the Hurons.
This part of the line is now called the Tay Shore Trail. 
You can see the location at http://maps.google.com/maps
This picture was taken and submitted by Bruce Raynor
The CPR "Canadian" over the Nipigon River;  from 
a postcard he had sent to his folks,  back in the late 1950s
This picture was submitted by Massey F. Jones
CP Highway bridge, London Ontario
This picture was taken and submitted by Bruce Raynor
CP Highway bridge, London Ontario
This picture was taken and submitted by Bruce Raynor
CP Bridge over the Thames River and Oxford St.
London, ON. Taken Oct 1982
This picture was taken and submitted by James Booth, Willingdon AB
CP Bridge over the Thames River and Oxford St.
London, ON. Taken Oct 1982
This picture was taken and submitted by James Booth, Willingdon AB
CP Bridge over the Thames River and Oxford St.
London, ON. Taken Oct 1982
This picture was taken and submitted by James Booth, Willingdon AB
CP Bridge over the Thames River and Oxford St.
London, ON. Taken Oct 1982
This picture was taken and submitted by James Booth, Willingdon AB
CP Bridge over the Thames River and Oxford St.
London, ON. Taken Oct 1982
This picture was taken and submitted by James Booth, Willingdon AB
CP Bridge over the Thames River and Oxford St.
London, ON. Taken Oct 1982
This picture was taken and submitted by James Booth, Willingdon AB
CP 4223 at east end of the Oxford St Bridge
London Ont July 1984
This picture was taken and submitted by James Booth, Willingdon AB
CP Bridge over the Thames River and Oxford St.
London, ON. Taken Oct 1982
This picture was taken and submitted by James Booth, Willingdon AB  
 This two lane bridge one block East of the  Thames River and Oxford St Bridge in London Ont. Oct 1982 
This picture was taken and submitted by James Booth, Willingdon AB
This railway bridge belonged to the L&PS RY and crossed over the south branch of the Thames River just south of 
the L&PS RY shops. In the photograph you will notice steel brackets on the side of the bridge. When I was a teenager these brackets supported a  walkway from one side of the river to the other. I used this walkway many times walking between home and highschool.
The bridge was last used by CN.
This picture was taken and submitted by James Booth, Willingdon AB

 
This bridge was located on Sarnia Road between 
Wonderland Road and Hyde Park, Road in
London Ontario.

The interesting part of this story is that this beautiful structure was built in 1890 in St. James Manitoba and 
was dismantled for the first time and relocated
to London Ontario in 1909, where it was reconstructed
and used as a "single lane" overpass for the next 102
years, until March 2011. Unfortunately the powers to
be in London Ontario did not appreciate the magnificence
of having a piece of this history and chose to dismantle
this marvellous structure against one suggestion to keep
it as a foot path and build the new highway along side of it.
 

This picture was taken and submitted by Janice Bentley
This bridge was located on Sarnia Road between 
Wonderland Road and Hyde Park, Road in
London Ontario.
This picture was taken and submitted by Janice Bentley

 
The following four pictures were submitted by Jack D. Kozlowski, Mississauga, Ontario
and they were taken near Lakefield, Ontario. 
This used to be the CN rail line from Peterborough, Ontario to Lakefield, Ontario.
This site is part of Silent Lake and Kawartha Highlands Parks, Ontario, Canada

 
Old CN railway bridge near Lakefield, ON
The righ-of-way of the Peterborou-Lakefield railway
Abandoned Swing Bridge near Peterborough
Abandoned Swing Bridge near Peterborough
 Jack also submitted the following pictures
CN Pickerel River Town, Rail Bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Jack D. Kozlowski, Mississauga, Ontario
CP Pickerel River Train Bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Jack D. Kozlowski, Mississauga, Ontario
CP French River Rail Bridge 
This picture was taken and submitted by Jack D. Kozlowski, Mississauga, Ontario
CNR Railway Underpass at Kinmoount Ont. 1970's
This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Parker
CNR Wooden Bridge over the CNR Tracks at
Otter Lake Ont. August 2001
This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Parker
CNR Wooden Bridge over the CNR Tracks at
Otter Lake Ont. August 2001
This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Parker
Hoggs Bay Trestle over the CNR tracks at
Midland Ont. 1950's
This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Parker
CNR Abadoned Railway Bridge over the Wye River just
south of Wyevale Ont. 
This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Parker
The Harstone Trestle is located  30 km west of 
Thunder Bay Ontario.  This trestle is located on the
original roadbed of the Port Arthur Duluth and Western Railway.  CNoR had the line for a while and then CNR. 
This trestle was built in 1922 by CNR.  It crosses the Kaministiquia River, below Kakabeka Falls.
This picture was taken and submitted by Tim Lukinuk, Thunder Bay, ON
The Harstone Trestle 
 

The Harstone trestle is being studied for removal, replacement or refurbishment. 
There is an online petition. Plase help save this bridge.
This bridge, constructed in 1922, is one of the few
remaining traces of the historic Port Arthur, Duluth
and Western (Pee Dee) Railway. The replacement of 
the bridge would mean the loss of an important piece
of the history of the area.

This picture was taken and submitted by Tim Lukinuk, Thunder Bay, ON
The Kaministiquia River Swing Bridge, Thunder Bay, ON
It is a steel throughtruss built in 1909. Was built by the Grand Trunk Railway.  It is still used by CNR. 
The approaches to the bridge were burnt in a fire in 
October of 2013. 
Train traffic has resumed, but not vehicle traffic.
This bridge is listed on the Ontario Heritage Bridge list.
This picture was taken and submitted by Tim Lukinuk, Thunder Bay, ON
CNR Mckellar Lift Bridge – Scherzer rolling lift bridge 1911.  Thunder Bay Ontario.  McKellar River between
the Mission and Mckellar Islands.

Note the Sleeping Giant in the background.
This bridge is listed on the Ontario Heritage Bridge list.

This picture was taken and submitted by Tim Lukinuk, Thunder Bay, ON
CNR Kaministiquia Bascule Lift Bridge - Strauss 
Thunder Bay, ON It is a trunion bascule bridge
built in 1911
This bridge is listed on the Ontario Heritage Bridge list.
This picture was taken and submitted by Tim Lukinuk, Thunder Bay, ON
CNR Kaministiquia Bascule Lift Bridge - Strauss
Thunder Bay, ON It is a trunion bascule bridge
built in 1911
This bridge is listed on the Ontario Heritage Bridge list.
This picture was taken and submitted by Tim Lukinuk, Thunder Bay, ON

 
Links
Visit                  our Home in Summerville Nova Scotia. This house was                  built in 1873.
Where we live and what we do
A Nova                  Scotia Snow Storm Hits Summerville
A Nova Scotia Snow Storm Hits Summerville
The Halifax & South-Western Museum
A tribute to the Steam Locomotives of the CNR
A tribute to the Steam Locomotives of the CPR
Robot Cars
The Old Railway Stations of Canada
Canadian Railway Artifacts
The Newfoundland Railway
Old Canadian Diesels
   
Old Canadian Rolling Stock Passenger Cars
Old Canadian Rolling Stock Freight Cars
Electric Locomotives and Street Cars
Industrial and on Site Diesel  Locomotives
The Scrap Yard
Canadian Old Logging Equipment
and Steam and Diesel Locomotives
The Grain Elevators of Western Canada
Canadian National Railways Motive Power Statistics Index
Railway Maintenance Equipment
And Old Railway Rolling Stock
Canadian Railway Tunnels with a detailed look 
at the CPR Spiral Tunnels
Jerry Barnes' Garden Railway, The SCRR
The Nova                  Scotia Railway Heritage Society
The Nova Scotia Railway Heritage Society
Historic Aircraft Pictures
Visit John's Old Car and Truck Pictures
The Yard Limit's page on the
Windsor & Hantsport Railway (WHRC)
CN Pensioners' Association
The Stanley Steamer

For all you steam fans, this page is a must

Visit Lonnie Hedgepeth's 
of Rocky Mount, North Carolina site.
He has used the plans provided on Covered Bridge Plans  webpage and is building a Covered Bridge for his
Live Steam train.
The building trades class at Darlington HS in Darlington, Wisconsin built this covered bridge for a local business man
 Tour the 64 remaining Covered Bridges
 of New Brunswick
The Covered Bridges that once
dotted Nova Scotia.
Lilies From the Valley
A Vast selection of Oriental and Asiatic previously cut commercially grown bulbs ready for shipment anywhere in Canada
Visit my Jeep page
A Picture Review of the Jeeps
from 1940 to the present
A Picture Review of the 
Nash, Hudson 
and the cars of American Motors
A Picture Review of the Hudsons and Terraplanes
that were found in Australia
A Picture Review Studebaker
A Picture review of the Packard
A Picture Review of the
Pickup Truck from 1940 to 1969
A Picture review of the Volkswagen
A Picture Tour of the Kaiser Frazer
A                  Picture Tour of the
A Picture Tour of the Henry J
A Picture Tour of the Crosley
A Picture Review of the Chevrolet
from 1916 tto 1970
A Picture Review of the Ford
from 1908 to 1969
The Chrysler Airflow
View                  some of John Evan's Artwork
View some of
John' Evan's Artwork
This site has quite a collections 
of John's artwork.
View these old cars as you haven't before.
Eric Gordon's Kaiser Rebuild
There are many pictures showing the
details of this Rebuild
E Mail

 
 
 
 


 

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