Canadian Train Bridges and Trestles
Alberta
 
 

View my Alberta section of this page for the
most up to date pictures of The CPR's Bonnybrook Bridge
collapse, southeast of downtown Calgary Alberta.
There are some extremely detailed Close up of the damage.
This pictures were provided by Massey F. Jones



 
I decided to write this page on railway bridges after a visitor Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba offered to give me a number of railway bridge pictures that he had collected.
I again hope that my visitors will be sending me their pictures to be
included on this page.  johnmacdonald@summerville-novascotia.com

 
 

 
 
Manitoba
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Quebec and Ontario
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The Lethbridge Viaduct

 
Encased in a Plexiglas case at the Galt Museum
in Lethbridge, Alberta is a replica of the travelling
crane, used to build the CPR High Level Bridge, 
also called the Lethbridge Viaduct, created in 1994 by Engineer Robert J.D Gardner, to a scale of 1:87
(HO Gauge) and donated to the Sir Alexander 
Galt Museum as an artifact.

The orange beam in the background  is part of 3 pillars depicting the viaduct on a  larger scale and it dominates dominates that portion of the exhibition floor.  Some 
of the explanations in the following captions are copied
from the two panels to the left and others researched.
The viaduct features 33 towers in total, employed 100 workers and cost $1.33 million; which today would 
amount to billions. Close-ups of this fine model are 
seen in adjacent pictures, all taken on April 11th, 2014.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Inching forward, the travelling crane lifted and moved 
steel rails and girders either from the valley floor or
from a flat car under its belly, after it encountered the
river. There was in total 18 kilometers of cable to do 
the lifting. In this view, the front portion has yet to
be fitted with rails before the erector moved forward..

The chief engineer was John Edward Schweitzer 
(April 1870 – January 1911), who worked for the
CPR,  while the bridge was built by the Canadian
Bridge Company of Walkerville, Ontario.

Another project for which Mr. Schweitzer is widely 
known for,  is the construction of the famous CPR 
Spirals Tunnels west of Lake Louise, covered 
extensively at 
http://yourrailwaypictures.com/Tunnels/

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A closer look at the exhibit reveals a riveter or
a painter on the platform and more platforms below. 
Missing on this model; is a smaller traveller which
followed the crane as it moved forward and whose 
sole purpose it was to feed compressed air to the
riveting crew below. It is visible in a period picture,  somewhere else on this page.

Over 12,000 tonnes of steel and 13,000 cubic
metres of concrete became necessary to assemble
the steel bridge, also called a viaduct, in 1909. 
At 1.6 km long and 100 metres high, it is the longest
structure of its kind in the world.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
In this view, a girder section at the front, is about 
to be join the rest of the bridge. The steam boiler
and other controls were all housed the travelling 
crane, which was constructed on-site. The structure
likely also contained the engineering office at the
front, where blueprints were consulted and
calculations made and the rear contained the
machinery.

The two hoses on back lead to a smaller unit, which, 
along with the larger unit moved forward, feeding
compressed air to the riveting crew on platforms
below. The exhaust stack for the steam-powered
crane can be seen about the upper middle of the 
picture. View the period picture on the page,
for the set-up

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Notice the fine detail that went into this model.
A plaque in front of the model indicates that the 
scale is 1:87 (HO Scale), where 1 scale ft. on the 
model represents 87 ft. in real time. These are
probably the painters. The bridge was painted black.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A 1909 photo of the travelling crane and smaller
riveter; which followed the crane as it moves along
the bridge, providing compressed air.

The viaduct has a slight ascent westward of 0.4% 
and has no tangents (curves). Additional precautions 
were taken because of severe winds usually 
experienced in the area, it was decided to build
the sides in such a way that a train wouldn't be 
running off the bridge deck. The bridge is erected 
on concrete pedestals.

Source: Sir Alexander Galt Museum and Archives P19738126000 on wall 
near the model display - MF Jones copy.
Looking towards city center from almost the very 
end of the viaduct in West Lethbridge, we get a good
idea of some of the construction of one of the towers, 
which after the road, drop sharply into the Oldman 
river, before rising on the other side. The road under
the bridge is Crowsnest Trail, which a few metres to
the left down the road, will hook up to Alberta 
Highway #3 and eventually lead into the southern 
part of BC.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
By the looks of this sign, a lot of trespassers have been
on the tracks. This view looks slightly below the track at West Lethbridge, almost to the end of the viaduct.
The largest rail bridge in Canada is an adventure magnet
for BASE jumpers who like to hike to the the middle of
the 1.6 km ( 5,327 ft.) and then parachute off the bridge .
In 2013, there was a $287 fine by CPR police for doing so.

Whereas old style trestles had small platforms to hold 
water barrels and seek refuge and  a pedestrian on the
bridge could seek refuge there while a train happens, 
the Lethbridge viaduct does not have this extra safety feature. From rail to river is a drop of 314 ft.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
CP Freight High Level Bridge Lethbridge AB in August 1992, viewed from Indian Battle Park
The park name commemorates the last battle between
the Cree and the Blackfoot, fought here in 1870. Much
of the battle took place in Indian Battle Coulee on the 
west side of the river (to the left), while the retreat 
across the river ended in a last stand close to the
Coal Banks Interpretive Centre (near this picture site). 
A formal peace treaty between the two nations was
signed the following year.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Almost the entire viaduct, viewed from one of 
the parking lots behind The University of 
Lethbridge, on a very blustery cold April 11th, 2014.

In the middle, the road is Whoop-Up Drive. 
The view overlooks Boterhill Bottom Park (near)
and Indian Battle Park (center), the latter featured 
on this page

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A composite of 2 photos this view shows the entire bridge almost from end-to-end, looking west from the end of 
1 Ave South.
The road eventually joins Crowsnest Trail and leads
into Southern BC. To the left is a large parking lot.
The bridge is 1.6 km log and a bit over 100 m high, 
with 33 towers.
Massey F. Jones collection

 
The Lethbridge high level bridge with a train that had two engines in the front then cars the full length of the bridge, a robot and another set of cars the full length of the bridge, another robot, another set of cars the full length of the bridge again and a robot at the tail end pushing. Based on the length of the bridge which is believed to be very close to a mile, this train was somewhere around 15,000 feet long or 3 miles!

 
 Lethbridge high level bridge
This picture was taken by Peter J Wilson
Lethbridge high level bridge
This picture was taken by Peter J Wilson
Lethbridge high level bridge
This picture was taken by Peter J Wilson
Lethbridge high level bridge
This picture was taken by Peter J Wilson
CPR Monarch Bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Looking similar and constructed about the same time and by the same company as the High Level Bridge in 
Lethbridge AB (named for William Lethbridge, 1825-1901), the CPR Monarch Bridge is often overlooked by 
railfans visiting the area. Yet, it is only located 23 km (14 mi) northwest of its big brother on Highway 3, about
half-way between Lethbridge and Fort Macleod. It has the same structure but not as long or high.

It greatly shortened the distance and lessened the grades when it was built in 1908-1909 to replace a series of short bridges. The steel for this bridge was brought by rail in pieces from the Dominion Bridge Company of Walkerville Ontario and assembled with the famous “erector” which had constructed the big one.  The Monarch Bridge stands 
48m above the Oldman River and measures 576m end to end, while the Lethbridge Viaduct is about a kilometer
longer, but still massive and a sight to see. Situated on the CPR Crownest Sub., it sees occasional from the US into Calgary, which has or will pass on its bigger cousin. 

The GPS location of the bridge is approximately 49º48’6”N 113º12’09.4W.  The best vantage point is aroud a curve
from Highway 3 (where this photo was taken from a moving bus on April 13th, 2014) but there are roads leading right 
to it. Another notable rail bridge in the area is located at Carmangay on the CPR Alderside Sub. It looks like this one
but is smaller and newer (1927). View it at https://albertacommunityprofiles.com/Profile/Carmangay/255 or better still: http://www.railpictures.net/photo/404342/

Submitted by Massey F. Jones
MONARCH, listed on an abbreviated version of Employee Timetable No. 86, May 29, 1983.
Newer employee timetables will show KIPP at Mileage 11.0 CP Crowsnest Sub, which is where the 
Lethbridge CPR yard has now moved. See my Station page http://yourrailwaypictures.com/TrainStations/indexCentral.html for more details.
Photo: Late Lorne Unwin – Massey F. Jones collection
A 1980s view of the trestle, just north of Carmangay, Alberta, located 62 kilometres (39 mi) north of Lethbridge 
and 150 kilometres (93 mi) south of Calgary, along the CPR Alderside Sub. Timetable 23, shown on my Western 
statios page at http://yourrailwaypictures.com/ TrainBridges/indexAlberta.html shows the location of Carmangay
well, in relation to Calgary and Lethbridge. The trestle is used infrequently between the two cities for freight service only.
The name Carmangay originates from C.W Carman and his wife Gertrude Gay, who operated a wheat farm on what is now the trestle site. It is unknown who built the bridge but Dominion Bridge erected similar structures on the Crowsnest Sub, more to the south, at Monarch and Lethbridge (both shown on this page), about the same time period. Very easy of 
access, the trestle was built by the CPR in 1911 as a wooden bridge and replaced by the by a steel structure in 1928. View a period photo of the trestle being changed from wood to steel at http://www.galtmuseum.com/permalinkA/5005/

Published data puts it at 150m long (just short of 500 ft.) and 44m high (just short of 150 ft.). In its time, the Carmangay trestle was the longest for its height. Excellent close-ups photos of the trestle from various angles at http://www.bigdoer.com/6720/exploring-history/bridge-hunting-carmangay-alberta/

The Beaver River Trestle near Grand Centre in Northeastern Alberta, likely photographed from an RCAF plane 
from Cold Lake, because the trestle is on the flight path. The trestle is a combination timber, as well as truss and
girder built in 1931 and stands 60 metres high spanning 450 metres across the valley.

When CN abandoned rail service in 1999, ten municipalities and a volunteer organization worked together to
acquire the 300km. long corridor and it became part of what is now called the Iron Horse section of the 
Trans Canada Trail, linking Cold Lake Alberta, to Northwestern Saskatchewan with many small towns 
along the way.

It took two years after ownership was secured in 2001, in order to have the corridor in good enough shape for
multi-use as a recreation trail. Opened in June of 2003, it  has since grown to be the region's largest tourist 
attraction with an average of 20,000 users per year http://travelalberta.com/Things%20to%20Do/Scenic%20Routes/Iron%20Horse%20Trail.aspx

The trestle was damaged in June 2012 after a lit car was pushed off the north end embankment, became 
lodged in the trestle and set the structure ablaze, the latest fire to the structure. A fund was then set up to
repair the trestle and make it an area attraction again for walkers, bicycle riders and motorized transport, 
such as ATVs in the summer and snowmobiles in winter.

Massey F. Jones collection
Beaver River Alberta
This trestle bridge crosses the Beaver River going into Cold Lake, Alberta. The train service has been discontinued
but this bridge is now part of a cross country trail and is spectacular
This picture was submitted by Svala Dunn

 
Canadian Northern Railway Bridge, Calgary Alberta


The Canadian Northern Railway steel bridge was built in 1914 to handle the heaviest trains at the time. At one end was the railway station, purchased for offices in 1911 and converted to a station in 1913.  The other end was a 23-acre area purchased from the Lindsay Estate in 1911 for a yard
(called McKee Yard), which had 10 tracks.

Upon arrival, passenger trains entered the station northbound, to the end of the platform. The coaches were then uncoupled and a yard switcher hauled them to the yard, where they were cleaned and turned 180 degrees on a wye. The locomotive then followed under its own steam, proceeding to the roundhouse, where it too was serviced and turned on the turntable. 

Prior to departure, a switcher pushed the coaches across the bridge to the station and the locomotive backed up to its train.  Now facing in the proper south direction, everything was ready to leave.

The CNoR station served passengers from 1911 to 1918, when CNoR became absorbed by the Canadian National, which used the tracks until 1971. 
In the last years of service, the bridge handled two CN "Railiners" (RDC cars), one from Calgary to Drumheller, the other one from Calgary to Edmonton via Three Hills and Mirror in Northeast Central Alberta. 

McKee Yard was purchased by the City of Calgary in 1970 and developed as Lindsay Park. In 1999, the side platforms were removed from the bridge and the area dotted with a few interpretive displays, including a bit of the old track. The bridge was then reserved solely for pedestrians and bicycles
only and it sees fairly constant use. 

The station stood vacant until a fire gutted most of the interior in 1985 and it was restored in 1987. For more details see my Station page: http://yourrailwaypictures.com/TrainStations/indexCentral.html

Nordegg AB
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
Nordegg AB
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
Nordegg AB
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
Nordegg AB
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
Rocky Mtn House AB
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
Rocky Mtn House AB
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
Rocky Mtn House AB
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
The bridge, as it appeared circa 1914, scanned from a Glenbow Museum Archives (ND-8-306) purchased slide. 
The church on the left is the old St Mary's Cathedral, 
now reconstructed.
Submitted by Massey F. Jones
The front end of the Canadian Northern station at 
141 - 18 Ave. S.W in Calgary from a Glenbow Archives
slide. It was used by the Canadian National Railways
until 1971. See my Western stations page for more details
Submitted by Massey F. Jones 
The Canadian Northern Railway bridge deck, looking straight north. Notice the Calgary downtown core in the distance. The bridge is limited to pedestrians and bicycles. 
Photo: Massey F. Jones
The CNoR Bridge was built to accommodate the heaviest locomotives at the time. Notice that it is now in a pastoral setting, with the Elbow River flowing under the bridge. 
This view looks west. 
Photo: Massey F. Jones
This view looking northeast shows the large piers to
where the platform was extended in the train passenger 
days, to enable them to detrain and proceed to the
station to the left. 
Photo: Massey F. Jones
A close-up from a large 1979 map showing the yard. 
No tracks exist there anymore. The bridge is at the top
left corner.
Notice the Calgary Stampede Grounds to the right (Exhibition Grounds). 
Submitted by Massey F. Jones

 
Hard to believe that this humble little bridge over the 
Elbow River, almost in front of Fort Calgary at 9 Avenue 
and 8 Street SE, is directly responsible for Calgary being 
the city that it is today.

Between 1881 and 1885, as the CPR was pushing west,
speculators were buying lots in what is now the Inglewood District, in the hope of selling their land to the  railway 
and make a large profit. After having safely secured the lands across the Elbow River to the west of Fort Calgary, particularly the strip along where the Palliser Hotel now stands, CPR announced that its townsite would be situated there and the speculators went bust, as a good deal of
citizens decided to move their gear across the ice the following winter and settle into the new townsite, which became Calgary.

The train on the bridge, is most probably what is known locally as "The Keith Turn"; heading back to Alyth classification Yard, from the CPR overflow yard (Keith)
on the west side of Stoney Trail in Northwest Calgary. http://www.matthicksphoto.com/railway-photography/
canadian-pacific/3071-keith-1.jpg.php

Notice the two different paint schemes on the diesels

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
VIA6428 Crossing the Twin Bridges, Bowness Calgary AB
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
VIA Dayliner crossing the Bow River in Calgary July 20, 1985, bound for Edmonton on the CP Red Deer Sub.

Service was discontinued shortly thereafter

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The CPR Bridge spanning the Bow River in Calgary 
between Alyth Yard (12th STREET EAST), Mileage
0.0 and BENGAL, Mileage 1.1 on the Red Deer
Subdivision.

The train is inbound for Alyth and the view looks east 
along the Bow River from an area behind the Calgary 
Zoo in the early 2000s. Bengal is roughly situated below
the Calgary Herald Building to the east, or the Telus
Spark science centre to the west. Access my bridge page
for several photos of a round culvert train tunnel there.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
View from Ogden Road in Calgary looking north. In the background, the CN bridge leads to Sarcee Yard (right). 
Not used much anymore.  In the foreground, theCP mainline (Brooks Sub). A half-mile to the right is Ogden (Alstrom) shops and a few yards to the left is the south end
of Alyth Yard.The locos are going into a siding into
Ogden yard.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Edmonton High Level Bridge 

The bridge opened in 1913, linking Edmonton to 
South Edmonton (Strathcona).
 CPR  ceased operations on the bridge in 1989 
Still an imposing structure, (755 m long and 49 m high),
it served as a transfer link between the South Edmonton station (see my Stations page) and the CNR downtown, until its  yard
 was bulldozed, to build the Grant McEwan University downtown campus. 
Rail used the top deck, while cars,  transit buses and
pedestrians use wooden sidewalks on both sides of the
lower deck. Trucks are prohibited on the bridge. 

On the opposite side from this view is, a "waterfall" higher than Niagara Falls, which operates during holiday weekends. 

In the foreground is the Edmonton Transit LRT,
across the North Saskatchewan Riverto the 
University of Alberta and beyond. 
For more details on this bridge see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Level_Bridge_(Edmonton)

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Edmonton High Level Bridge

During summer, the Edmonton Radial Railway Society
operates a streetcar on the uppper deck. 
The photo shows a view of downtown Edmonton from the streetcar. 
In a few minutes, it will arrive at Grandin Station (one stop
from downtown), after having left Old Strathcona and gone through a former CPR  tunnel.
A ride on this private right-of-way is worth every penny. 
http://www.edmonton-radial-railway.ab.ca/ 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Edmonton's High Level Bridge, taken from the 21st floor of a downtown hotel, early October 2011.
This is the side, out of which flows The Great Divide Waterfall http://www.edmonton.ca/attractions_recreation
No trucks are allowed on the bridge, which is reserved for cars, transit buses and pedestrians.
The left centre of the photo(orange portion), shows 
how cars come off the bridge.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
From May (Victoria Day) to October (Canadian Thanksgiving) , the Edmonton Radial Railway Society operates one or 2 streetcars (depending upon the season) over the High Level Bridge, using former CPR trackage, on the top deck. 
Compared to the bridge size, little Osaka #247 tramway is 
insignificant. View the tramway history at:
http://www.edmonton-radial-railway.ab.ca/highlevelbridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Another series of the Edmonton's High Level Bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Bruce Raynor
 Edmonton's High Level Bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Bruce Raynor
Edmonton's High Level Bridge

This an Edmonton Radial Railway's alternate tramway, 
(Melbourne # 930 - built 1947)
which the Edmonton Radial Railway Society uses during the
busy summer season, in addition to their Osaka #2 streetcar shown elsewhere.
http://www.edmonton-radial-railway.ab.ca/streetcars
All their tramways have been lovingly restored by volunteers 
in their carbarn, next to Old Strathcona Farmers' Market.
This view looks toward the city from the south shore of the 
North Saskatchewan River.

This picture was taken and submitted by Bruce Raynor
Edmonton's High Level Bridge

According to ERRS  history, the bridge deck
had 3 tracks and the CPR used the center tracks.
The operation was left hand running, so that if the street
cars became disabled, passengers wouldn't have to step
out in space. But there were never any accident and the
operation ran  accident-free until abandonment in 1951.

This picture was taken and submitted by Bruce Raynor
The CN bridge over Ogden Road in Calgary. The track
is a spur off Sarcee Yard (about a kilometre away in the background). The CPR Brooks Sub runs under the bridge 
and the south end of Alyth classification yard is nearby.
For those without transportation, Calgary Transit
Route #24 runs for a great portion, alongside Alyth Yard and the Brooks Sub. 
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
CN 1286 runs on a spur out of Sarcee Yard (in the 
background to a local industry in the mid-nineties.) 
They aren't used much anymore.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The CN bridge over Ogden Road and CPR Brooks sub, in southeast Calgary Sep 88. Calgary Transit bus Route 24 follows most of Alyth classification yard and a goodportion
of the Brooks Sub.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
This is a very rare photo of the Alberta Central Railway pillars taken in October 1989.  Only one pillar is left today; along Taylor Drive, just north of 22nd Street in Red Deer AB, where it is one of the historic landmarks
The west pillar (to the left in the photo) was removed in
1992 for the construction of Taylor Drive on the former
CPR right of way (the tracks  shown here). 
The pillars had supported the ACR bridge over the
CPR in 1910-11 but (the bridge)  was likely never used 
as the CPR took over the ACR and had no interest in the east section. The date when the actual bridge was removed cannot be determined. More details on the pillar can be
found at http://www.forthjunction.com/dawe-acr-pillar.htm
The Forth Junction Heritage Society www.forthjunction.com also has a few links on the early area railways, such as the ACR the Canadian Northern Western Railway and the Calgary & Edmonton Railway (C&E) including stations, 
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Historic railway site sign at the site of the 
Alberta Central Railway bridge
This picture was submitted by Massey F. Jones and was taken by his 
wife on April 17th, 2010
The pillar as it appears today. In the background is Taylor Drive, constructed where the tracks once  stood.
The opposite side of the pillar shown above
This picture was submitted by Massey F. Jones
The twin bridges in the the Bowness area of northwest 
Calgary, photographed from Bowmont Park, adjacent to 
the Silver Springs community (easily reached by Transit 
and driving). The view looks roughly southwest. 

The photo was taken on the rainy day in August 2010, while awaiting an inbound run of the CPR 2816 through the
bridges, about 6 miles or so from City Center on the CPR Laggan Sub.
In the near background is the 85 St. road bridge and beyond is Stoney Trail, the future ring road around Calgary. 
Under Stoney Trail is Keith Yard, basically the overflow
for the Alyth classification yard, used by the CPR for
longer term storage.

A bonus is that every train going through the twin bridges 
both ways must sound the horn, as the train comes around 
a curve westbound.   A favorite rite of passage for teens 
was (and still is) to jump  into the Bow River from the 
very top of the structures. Now the tracks are fenced 
off and CPR police patrols the area regularly, 
with a $200+ fine for trespassing. 

Freight trains run through there, either eastbound or
westbound about every hour, carrying grain, sulphur,
potash or containers on flatcars (double stack COFC)
 between Calgary and Vancouver.
Most are a mile or more in length, with Distributed Power,  usually 2 diesels in font, one in the middle and sometime
one at the end. 

Laggan Sub is the original Canadian Pacific Railway
mainline east and west, built in the late 1800s and
upgraded several times over. The Empress 2816, 
Royal Canadian Pacific and Rocky Mountaineer pass
through there regularly. A medium telephoto lens will
capture individual bridges nicely from that viewpoint,
if need be. 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
CNR bridge over the  Bow River taken from the Ogden-Millican district
This series of pictures were taken and submitted by Larry Buchan , Calgary, Alberta
Larry worked as a locomotive engineer on the CPR  out of Calgary.
CNR Bow River Bridge from underneath looking north
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
CNR Bow River Bridge from underneath looking south
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
CNR bridge over Bow River top view looking east
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
CNR bridge over MacLeod Trail near Calgary
Stampede Grounds
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
CNR bridge over Ogden Road
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
CNR bridge over Ogden Road taken from Bow River Bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
CNR steel bridge deck to replace wooden trestle over Deerfoot Trail
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
CNR wooden trestle being replaced by steel bridge
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
A good view of the CNR (GTP) high line that served
as a transfer lead with the CPR interchange tracks
to the right of the CPR control tower visible on the right.
It also serviced the Gulf Oil Refinery, and at one time 
ran to the Grand Trunk Pacific Terminal on the west 
side of the Elbow River where Fort Calgary was located.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
CPR and CNR ex Grand Trunk Pacific bridges over 
Bow River a transfer from the CNR to the CPR 
interchange was taking place at this time, Calgary's
skyline has changed a lot since this slide was taken.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Shown from a slightly different angle, a little more east 
of Larry Buchan's 1971 photo above,  is the CN high
line to the right and CPR mainline (Brooks Sub at about Milepost 170 or so) to the left. The view looks northwest from 50 Ave SE near Ogden Road in the summer of 2012 
and we note the Bonnybrook Bridge location. 

We can use the Calgary Tower to the extreme left as 
a reference point to compare the two photos. In Larry's photo, the silver road bridge to the left has now been removed but we can observe how close Ogden Road 
comes to the CPR tracks and it remains so, for about
a mile. (Those without their own transportation will
want to use Calgary Transit Route 24). 

The strip in the centre of Massey's picture is a part 
of a 28 km bicycle pathway passing under the CN Bridge 
and connecting with others in to the downtown core,
while the Irrigation Canal in the foreground provides 
water from the Bow River to farmlands southwest of 
Calgary. A side view of the timber bridge over the 
canal is shown elsewhere on this page.

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
CPR Bonnybrook Bridge over Bow River there
are three tracks visible P-1 the mainline, P-2 lead,
and Old Ogden lead, not visible is a steel bridge attached
in 1971 when the Alyth yard was rebuilt and it ran to the CPR's Ogden Shops and other industrial leads.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
GP9u 1635, in December 1987, switching on the 1971 Bonnybrook Bridge, adjacent to its partner, the 1912 
bridge which collapsed during the 2013 flood. Part of 
the old bridge is hidden by the trackside shack to the left.

To the right is the CN interchange bridge, featured on
this page, bringing cars from its nearby Sarcee Yard to 
the CP Alyth Yard. Also seen in a distance is the pulldown tower (which controls the hump yard) and the 12 Street Tower, which controls movements on the  Red Deer, Macleod, Brooks and Laggan Subs; north, south, east
and west out of Calgary.

The large chimney about the middle is the Alyth Diesel 
Shop complex. Improvements to the yard in the late 80s 
or middle 90s removed the chimney and expanded the 
shop to accommodate larger diesels.

This view looks just about straight north from a point 
around 50 Ave and Ogden Road in southeast Calgary.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones

  June 27th  2013, a portion of the 1912 CPR Bonnybrook Bridge southeast of downtown
Calgary collapsed with 6 tank cars on it


At 4:15 am MT,  June 27th  2013,  a portion of the 1912
CPR Bonnybrook bridge southeast of downtown Calgary collapsed with 6 tank cars on it, all but one carrying a flammable liquid. The cars were at risk of falling into the fast-moving Bow River, but officials  tethered the cars together so they would dangle over the water instead of floating down the river, if they fell farther. 

This view looks northeast at 3 pm the next day, 
June 28th. The large bridge in the background is an interchange CN bridge connecting the CN Sarcee Yard
and CP Alyth Yard.  The rising water also damaged a
lot of the shore and flows from left to right in this picture.

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A close-up of the damage. According to the Calgary Emergency Management Agency, the bridge dropped
more than 0.6 metres (about 1.5 feet+) in 90 minutes following a 'structural failure.'
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The damage span , viewed from the other shore of the
Bow River. The water flow goes under the large bridge
first. Within 24 hours of the bridge collapse, CPR had removed 6 tank cars stuck on the Bonnybrook Bridge 
by apparently pulling them apart from each end and 
rail traffic then resumed to some extent, using a
parallel track between the damaged bridge and the 
CN bridge in the background.. 
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A closeup of the view above, taken around 3 pm on 
June 28th 2013, showing how a portion of the CPR Bonnybrook came close to falling into the river and
how the water flow is still flowing fairly fast, 3 days 
after the Alberta Flood.
 

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones

A CPR crew inspects the parallel plate deck bridge
installed in 1971 for damage. In a companion photo here, Larry Buchan mentions that we can't see this bridge. 
This view is from the large CN Bridge used as an 
interchange from CN to CP. 
 

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
All the tracks on the 1912 Bonnybrook Bridge were damaged. While taking these pictures, 3 extra-long trains
ran in and out of the Alyth Yard on the track to the right,
over a plate deck bridge installed in 1971. Everything will eventually be repaired.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A "cherry picker" fitted to "high railer" truck, allows workmen to inspect a rail deck bridge.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A welder is busy attaching cross beams to a 
supporting beam on August 9th, 2013, so that the 
damaged portion can be lifted.
Notice the chains holding the bridge so that it 
doesn't fall further and the holes made into the
lower I beams, for future use.

In the back of the worker are the wooden ties
from the nearby CN bridge seen elsewhere 
on the page.
 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Viewed from the south shore of the Bow River 
still running fairly fast, on August 9th, 2013, a
heavy duty crane is getting ready to lift the
damaged portion.
Another of the same type arrived on the north shore 
(far side) a short while later that afternoon, then 
things wound down for the weekend.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Click on this image for a larger view in a new window
Click on this image for a larger view in a new window
A scanning sonar image we created after the 
Bonnybrook failure. 
Note the downstream section of the shattered
pier laying on its side in the riverbed.
This picture was submitted Mike Steckhan, owner of "Inland Marine Technologies", Saskatoon SK.
The CN Bridge, connecting the south end of the 
CP Alyth Yard to the CN Sarcee Yard a short distance
away for interchange. This view looks northeast.

This is the other side of the bridge frequently seen in
photos of the damaged Bonnybrook Bridge below.

Notice its proximity to the downtown core. Railcars in
the background to the right are in Alyth Yard.

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Freight is interchanged almost daily from the CN Sarcee Yard in Calgary to the CPR Alyth Yard  though this timber bridge built early in the 20th Century and the
CN Bow River bridge in the background,  using either a  GMD-1 locomotives or other light switcher.

The track crosses a  paved cycle pathway to the left,
which continues from the regular (700 km) network from 
just east of downtown (near the Max Bell Arena) and
runs 26 km to Chestermere, a  bedroom community
east of the Calgary city limits. To the far left are the
CPR Bonnybrook Bridge tracks, damaged in June 2013. 

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
On October 26, 2013, only the centre portion had been removed. The coffer dam in the middle might be 
exploring ways to build a new pillar to support a rebuilt 100-year-old bridge 

The bridge beyond is a CN transfer bridge into
CP's Alyth Yard. 

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
This view looking south on October 26, 2013, shows
that the work has new been halted, 4 months, almost
to the day after a portion of the bridge gave away due
the flood; pending a decision on whether the centennial landmark will be replaced or repaired, because it can
still be very useful to CP yard operations.

Yard movements and through trains now use the final
portion of the Brooks Sub to enter and exit Alyth Yard.

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A Google Earth view, showing the Bonnybrook 
Canadian Pacific Railway Bridge in the centre, before
the June 2013 flood. Some of the heavy black portion, collapsed

All yard movements and mainline now use a separate 
bridge, built later, on the far side of the collapsed bridge.
The track and bridge at the very top in a distance,
 is a CN interchange into the CP Alyth Yard. 

The Bow River pathway, a popular shortcut for
commuter cyclists trying to avoid street traffic from downtown, ran under the CN and CP bridges was
heavily damaged by the June flood and repaired by end-October 2013.

 

This picture was submitted by Massey F. Jones and is from Google Earth
This view taken on 19 June 2014 looking northeast, 
almost exactly a year after the flood damaged the bridge, gives a good idea of the repair which has just been 
completed a few weeks before. The repaired 1912
bridge is historical because it is part of the line which 
reached downtown Calgary from the east in 1883.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
This view, looking southeast on June 23, 2014, a
lmost exactly a year after the flood, shows the repair
which was completed on the Bonnybrook Bridge a
few weeks earlier. Instead of redoing the iron truss
as it was in 1912, two pony plates were added, giving
more strength to the bridge. The concrete pier was also thickened and it’s evident that the new one on the left is different than the other one. A closeup of it is shown in another picture.

The cycle in front is part of 140 mile Bow River
Pathway system and to the left, passes under the Bonnybrook Bridge, then the CN bridge in the 
background, before reaching downtown, about 5 miles 
away, following the bike path around Alyth Yard.

The train is on the mainline and not the bridge, which 
is mainly used now mainly for switching in and out of
the yard or for local loads.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A good view of the repair work, showing the new
bridge plates installed and the reinforced pier to
the left, on 23 June 2014, one year after the flood
damaged this portion of the 1912 bridge. Compare 
this photo with some of the close-ups of the damaged
portion on this page.

CP 8816 is on the adjacent 1971 bridge (about Mile
170 Brooks Sub), eastbound out of Alyth Yard
with a heavy load of more than 150 cars, perhaps 
deemed too heavy for the iconic 1912  bridge now.

Photo: Massey F. Jones from a video capture.
A southwest view from the Bow River bike path 
from a wooden platform firmly attached to the
riverbank in southeast Calgary. Cyclists and rare 
joggers from downtown, first  proceed under the
CN Bridge, then under the 1971 CP bridge and then
the historical 1912 bridge in quick succession. The
bike path is in heavy use as a convenient commuter
shortcut to downtown and was shut down during the 
2013 flood due to riverbank instability and rising
waters. It is well shown in the Google Earth picture
on this page.

There are 3 different kinds of bridges actually 
shown here. In the foreground is the CN truss bridge,
linking their Sarcee Yard to the CP Alyth Yard, and
then in the middle  the 1971 deck bridge (CP mainline approximately Mile 170 Brooks Sub) and finally in a distance, the 1912 pony bridge now freshly repaired;
in this view taken exactly a year after the flood on
June 23, 2014.

The motive power is CP 8614 in front and CP 8737
in the back.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A great spot for watching Alyth Yard action in 
the afternoon, while not trespassing on CP territory, 
is behind a row of warehouses at 2206-2234 Portland 
Road SE (or Mi 174.0 CP Brooks Sub). The site is 
easily accessible by Calgary Transit Route 24 OGDEN, 
plus about a 5-minute walk. For drivers, there is ample parking available.

While the action is not what it used to be
(CPR doesn’t like full yards), there is steady action 
going on to make up trains.

An alternate train watching spot (from overhead) is the Blackfoot Trail overpass in the background. 
Unfortunately for railfans, the sidewalk location was 
changed during reconstruction from the “good side” overlooking major yard action and the diesel shop to 
the north side, overlooking the action below seen here
from the ground. Blackfoot Tr. is accessible from 
Ogden Rd. or 9 Ave SE. Parking is at a premium or
a short walk is required, if taking the bus. No transit
goes on top of the overpass.

In this view, CP 2222 (GP20C-ECO) and CP 4428
(GP38-2) are actively switching, while in the middle,
we find CP 5985 (SD40-2), CP3049 (GP38-2) and
CP 2232, another GP20C-ECO. Within the half-hour, 
the GE locomotives by the white pickup truck will 
couple to those on the far side and pull a mile-long
mixed freight to Edmonton on the Red Deer Sub, to 
the extreme left centre.  The curving rail in front is a sidetrack now holding CP 3088 (GP38-2).

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Unlike many other CN bridges along the irrigation canal, 
this early 20th Century timber bridge is supported by concrete pillars. 

Constructed in 1903, the canal diverts water from the
Bow River into a 26 km waterway that drains from just
east of the Calgary downtown into Chestermere Lake,
a man-made reservoir  built in the 1880s by the CPR. 
The irrigation canal then continues on its course and
serves well over 400 farms in parched 
Southwestern Alberta 

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The only trestle in Calgary's Heritage Park,  designed
for drainage, instead of using a culvert. 
Trestles are custom built to fit the scenery. This one was erected in 1973 as a gift from the Canadian Pacific Railway.
The water barrels on the left side of the trestle are for fire fighting, in case the locomotive should accidentally drop cinders on the trestle.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Click on this image for a larger view in a new window
Click on this image for a larger view in a new window
The Battle River Trestle
The Railway Trestle, built in 1908, was the longest freestanding trestle in Canada 
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
The Battle River Trestle
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
The Battle River Trestle
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
CNR underpass and trestle at Villeneuve Road.
The bridge is northwest of St. Albert over Highway
633 on the CNR line that runs through St. Albert.
Built around 1908. It is also believed that the highway overpass section of this structor was rebuilt in the 
early 1980's.
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
CNR underpass and trestle at Villeneuve Road.
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
CNR underpass and trestle at Villeneuve Road.
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
CNR underpass and trestle at Villeneuve Road.
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
CNR underpass and trestle at Villeneuve Road.
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
CNR underpass and trestle at Villeneuve Road.
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
CNR underpass and trestle at Villeneuve Road.
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
CNR underpass and trestle at Villeneuve Road.
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
CPR wooden train trestle east of the town of
Meeting Creek AB
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
CPR  bridge over Elbow River taken from a
yard locomotive in 1982
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
The Burbank Bridge, north of Red Deer near Blackfalds Alberta on September 2nd, 1984..

It was originally a wood trestle bridge built over the
Blindman River north of Red Deer in 1910 by the
Canadian Northern Western Railway (now the CNR). 
The middle was eventually replaced by a steel truss
bridge with trestle ends. The length is around 620 feet 
and it is still being used by CN. 

Source: http://www.forthjunction.com/railway-bridges
-alberta.htm

The photo on their page doesn’t show the concrete
piers but it contains descriptions and views of all 
the major Alberta bridges.

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The Mintlaw Trestle is located a couple of miles 
southwest of Red Deer, Alberta.  It was built about
1911 for the Alberta Central Railway and finished in 
1912 by the Canadian Pacific Railway.  It is 2112 feet 
long and 110 feet high.  Last train in 1981.  There is a
group in Red Deer who are trying to raise money to
convert it into a foot bridge to become part of a
hiking trail.
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
The Mintlaw Trestle
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
The Mintlaw Trestle
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
The Mintlaw Trestle
This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB
This series of pictures were taken in October 1979 
when Larry was training as an engineer on the
Red Deer Subdivision north of Calgary, this was his
only trip he took on the Alberta Central Railway 
Subdivision and views are of a spectacular railway
bridge over the Red Deer River

Approaching the bridge

This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
On the bridge, the speed I believe was 10 mph at that time
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
View from middle of the bridge looking northward 
at the Red Deer River.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
View looking down towards river and water barrel stand
visible ahead
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Another view from the bridge I understand it still 
survives and the community is trying to do something
with it from what I've read
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
A 1984 photo of the old East Coulee rail bridge, which 
served the (now totally restored)
Atlas Coal Mine in the Alberta Badlands near
Drumheller.
http://www.atlascoalmine.ab.ca/

Built in 1948 likely by the CNR, the bridge is now 
still a prized local landmark and historical site but has
fallen into disrepair and no one wants to pay for the restoration. Access: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQg4gxCizHw
to view the present condition inside the bridge.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Wooden railway bridge over Red Deer River looking
towards yard at East Coulee, bridge tenders shanty
visible on right side center 1976.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Wooden railway bridge over Red Deer River looking
towards yard at East Coulee, bridge tenders shanty
visible on right side center 1976.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Looking back at the box cars I was riding while 
crossing the bridge. These are old cars used for 
loading bulk coal, for the few customers left that 
were using domestic heating coal.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Wooden truss bridge over the Red Deer River in East Coulee, Alberta The picture was taken  in 1976 it shows
the turntable in the foreground, and the shanty on the approach to the bridge that controled vehicular traffic, 
and train movements over this dual purpose bridge. 
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Winter scene of the wooden truss bridge over the 
Red Deer River in East Coulee, Alberta this is taken 
from near the tipple after I spotted the cars at the
Atlas Coal Mining Co. the last of hundreds of mines
that were in the Drumheller Valley March 1974.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 51.7 Laggan Subdivision railway bridge at Seebe 
over Bow River location of the old Calgary Power 
Electric dam site looking east
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 51.7 Laggan Subdivision railway bridge at Seebe 
over Bow River looking northeast 
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 51.7 Laggan Subdivision railway bridge at Seebe
over Bow River west span looking south
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 51.7 Laggan Subdivision railway bridge at Seebe 
over Bow River west span looking north
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 51.7 Laggan Subdivision railway bridge at Seebe
over Bow River east span
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 57 Laggan Subdivision railway bridge crossing
over Exshaw Creek looking north at Heart Mountain
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 57 Laggan Subdivision railway bridge looking 
eastward older bridge structure on left newer bridge
deck on the right mileage indicators on bridge abutments.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 53.1 Laggan Subdivision Kananaskis railway
bridge over Bow River looking northwest.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 53.1 Laggan Subdivision Kananaskis railway 
bridge over Bow River looking northeast.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 25.7 Laggan subdivision railway bridge over
Bow River at Cochrane looking west.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 25.7 Laggan subdivision railway bridge over
Bow River at Cochrane looking west.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 25.7 Laggan subdivision railway bridge over
Bow River at Cochrane looking southwest
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 25.7 Laggan Subdivision railway bridge over 
Bow River at Cochrane looking North-west.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Mile 25.7 Laggan Subdivision railway bridge over
Bow River at Cochrane with eastbound approaching.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
This bridge is located bridge found between Johnston Creek Camp site, Banff and the Bow River 
This picture was taken and submitted by Ron Hahn
This bridge is located bridge between Johnston Creek
Camp site, Banff and the Bow River 
This picture was submitted by Larry Buchan
These twin bridges used to be on the outskirts of Northwest Calgary near the district of Bowness, unfortunately a lot of kids used to use it in the summer to dive off of into the river, and there were many tragic accidents as there was a curvature on the approach in both directions, and trains
would be operating at speeds of 45 miles an hour so the outcome would be unavoidable, in the 90s the city of
Calgary even went to the trouble of building a pedestrian bridge nearby that the kids could use, but there are still
too many thrill seekers loving the element of danger, and playing chicken with trains.
This picture was submitted by Larry Buchan
Here are some photos of the East span looking West
towards Keith from the South side we see an eastbound
on the bridge.
This picture was submitted by Larry Buchan
This picture was submitted by Larry Buchan
These pictures show the East span looking westward, the photo of the mile board for Keith has been painted over 
and reads "ith" along with a under deck view, and the
center abutment.
This picture was submitted by Larry Buchan
This picture was submitted by Larry Buchan
This picture was submitted by Larry Buchan
West span of twin bridges looking East
This picture was submitted by Larry Buchan
Here are some photos of the West span of the twin 
bridges view one looking East, one showing a mileboard Brickburn siding, two views looking to the North, and 
some other views looking southward.
This picture was submitted by Larry Buchan
West span looking northward
This picture was submitted by Larry Buchan
West span looking northward
This picture was submitted by Larry Buchan
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
The following series of pictures were taken and submitted by Larry Buchan. They show the bridge crossing the Bow River going North to the Red Deer Subdivision from Bengal the control point where the 12 Street Tower interlocking operator directs traffic 
for incoming and outgoing trains.
Track schematic of Bengal and bridge over the Bow River
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Bengal station board.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Interlocking signals on south bank of Bow River 
At one time there were four tracks here
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Views of Bow River bridge looking northward
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Views of Bow River bridge looking northward
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Views of Bow River bridge looking northward
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Looking Northwest
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Looking Northwest
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Looking Northeast
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Looking Northeast.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Bridge over Bow River from the north bank
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Bridge over Bow River looking Southwest
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
In this view taken during the spring in the mid-80s,
CP 8106 has just crossed the north side of the 
Bow River Bridge east of the Calgary downtown 
core, most likely originating from Alyth Yard with
a load of newsprint. 

Near Bengal (Mile 1.1 Laggan Sub), it will switch 
east to the Meridian Yard lead and pass through a 
round culvert-type tunnel under Deerfoot Trail
(see Larry Buchan’s pictureshown below and 
climb a very steep grade to deliver its load at
The Calgary Herald building, up the hill. 

The locomotive is an SW1200RS, built by General 
Motors in June 1958 (ser# A1486).  It was removed
from service in August 1999 and sold to Louis 
Dreyfus Corp in the US. The RS designation means
that it’s also fit for road service, by being coupled
to other locomotives as extra power on the mainline.

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Meridian Yard lead that runs through tunnel under
Deerfoot Trail to service industries including the 
Calgary Herald, with grades of over 2.2% the
steepest in the terminal, and classed as
Mountain Grade.
CPR track profile showing Cochrane and bridge at 
Mile 26.8 , and Mitford 2 storage tracks for sulfur & LPG tank  empties the Copithorne spur starts just East of the track signal.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
At mile 27.2 Of the Laggan Subdivision is the Copithorne Spur that runs 8.94 miles, it services the Shell Oil Gas
plant at Jumping Pound approaching the plant at mile
8.01 is this wooden trestle, I took the photo in 1980, it has since been filled in with dirt and gravel. This spur had lots
of grades over 2% the steepest East of the Continental divide in Alberta.

We would gather up our loads of sulfur and LPG tanks, 
we were limited to  5 cars a unit, usually having a 2 units, later on in the 90s we had 3 units so we can handle 15 
cars. We would take off down  hill from the plant over 
this rickety wooden trestle and a speed as high as we 
could to get a 
swing at the  hill on the other side, if everything worked
out okay in the units it was snow trouble we would have 
a successful trip, otherwise we would leave half of our 
train, and take the rest over to a doubling spur, and go 
back for the second portion.

This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
CNR Rochfort Trestle near Mayerthorpe, Alberta
(Google maps 53.903049,-115.020289)
This is the longest wood trestle in North America
CNR 2,414 ft. (736 metres) long, 110 ft. tall It was built 
in 1914 over Paddle River. There were two short
portions replaced by steel This tressel is still in
use by CN
This picture was taken and submitted by Ronald Hahn
CNR Rochfort Trestle near Mayerthorpe, Alberta
(Google maps 53.903049,-115.020289)
This picture was taken and submitted by Ronald Hahn
Larry put together a series of pictures of a a small railway bridge located just north of the one he sent last time that crosses the Bow River on the Red Deer Subdivision. This Location Is called "Titian" and crosses Nose Hill Creek
The Pecten Sub trestle crosses over Highway 6, 
between Waterton Lakes National Park and 
Pincher Creek, AB. The bridge was built in the 1960s
when a spur was built off the CP Crowsnest mainline at Brocket, AB for a new Shell Gas complex, about 5-10 kilometers west of the bridge. It's built with wood on 
each side, and a steel deck overtop the highway, with 
steel reinforcing the wood. The Shell is still in use
today and the bridge carries CP's heaviest diesels on
a regular basis, a few times every week. 
This picture was taken and submitted by Braedan Dunne, May 21, 2013
The Pecten Sub trestle 
This picture was taken and submitted by Braedan Dunne
 St. Albert was built for the CNR in 1906 and is still 
in use as of Jan 2015
his picture was taken and submitted by Dale Redekopp, St. Albert, AB
Double bridge crossing Nose Hill Creek, original span
in foreground, and second  bridge deck added in the
early 2000's this view is looking eastward towards
Deerfoot Trail.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
CPR track profile from 197 showing Titian storage
siding and bridge over Nose Creek, I have some more pictures of the wooden trestle further north on the
Red Deer Subdivision about mileage 50, and some other wooden trestles over the CPR Western Irrigation District South of Alyth yard.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
A wooden trestle over Nose Creek on the  Red Deer Subdivision

Petro at mile 11.7 is where the Rockyview Spur leaves 
the Red Deer Sub going eastward 4.06 miles to service 
the Canadian Oxy Petroleum sulfur plant, and Turbo 
refinery in its day about a quarter of a mile from the
junction is this wooden trestle over Nose Creek. While
all the plants are shut down now the Turbo refinery was bought by Petro Canada and dismantled and shipped to
the Far East, the Spurs still remains sitting dormant, but there our plans afoot for the possibility of it servicing 
a new  Target warehouse facility in the future.

This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
CPR track profile showing Petro at mile 11.7
Red Deer Sub about 3 miles north of the old 
Beddington Siding
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Wooden Trestle bridge deck looking East
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
View looking Southeast
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
View showing Nose Creek meandering southward
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
View showing Nose Creek meandering southward.
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
View looking Northeast
This picture was taken and submitted by Larry Buchan
Research seems to indicate that this is the 
Briggs Trestle, a rare timber bridge and one of
the last ones in the region. It is located northwest
of Red Deer and spans a ravine near the Blindman 
River near the vanished village of Briggs, just
southwest of Blackfalds AB.

Estimated to be 570 to 590 feet long (about 200 
metres) and it was constructed in 1910 by the 
Canada Northwestern Railway, now CN and is 
still in use a century later to move material and 
equipment to and from oil and gas customers on
the Brazeau Sub.
Google Earth roughly situates it at 52º.20’.17”N 
and 113º.54’.12”W. The nearest coordinates in 
direct line,  are very roughly about 2.5 miles
(4km) west of the Queen Elizabeth II Highway 
(Alberta Highway 2) and 1.7 mile (2.74 km) exactly 
due north of 11A Highway.
Unfortunately, the trestle is not close to any public 
viewing point.

D. Grant Watson has property that is as close as one can get to this bridge and he has made off to any rail fan that wanted to photograph this trestle to make an appointment with him to do so via email at:
 nospam-grantwatson@nospam-hotmail.com
 Please remove the two nospam- from this address to use it.
 

Photo: Lorne Unwin - Massey F. Jones collection
The CN Brazeau Sub. 

Briggs is at Mile 38.0 between Alix Jct and Brazeau.

A footnote in the Time Table indicates that movements 
must not be operated beyond mileage 96.0, except by
special authorization.

Submitted by Massey F. Jones
Close-up of the LRT station end of the footbridge.
connecting the Calgary Transit SUNALTA  to the main Greyhound bus depot, at the western end of downtown Calgary. Several photo angles will become possible.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The LRT guideway into Calgary Transit SUNALTA LRT station connecting to downtown.
View an animation of the West LRT line at: http://www.westlrt.ca/contentabout/route_animation.cfm
Notice the Calgary Tower in the background.
The site is fully accessible from 9 Avenue SW.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The LRT consists has just come out of SUNALTA LRT station and now passes the CPR mainline, with the green signal indicating that a westbound consist is about to 
proceed under. The arched bridge in the background 
beyond the signals,  is a pedestrian bridge linking the 
Calgary Transit SUNALTA LRT to the Greyhound bus 
depot. Standing on the bridge makes it possible to get an overhead view of the track with the Calgary Tower in the background. A very small part of the LRT station can be
seen left centre, just under the bridge. See the view that 
can taken from it elsewhere on this page.
This slight telephoto view, taken from the corner of 11 St 
SW and 9 Ave at the edge of the downtown core (Mi. 1.1 Laggan Sub), looks west on May 20, 2014. Morning is the
best time to photograph this overpass in full sun.  Prior to 
9:00 am, will see traffic about every 5 minutes on the LRT bridge and it is about the time when eastbound CP freights also arrive in Calgary.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The brand new pedestrian overpass at Calgary Transit's SUNALTA LRT station offers a fairly spectacular view
of CPR Laggan Sub below (about Milepost 1.2), by just
stepping outside the LRT station door and taking a dozen steps. This view looks east towards downtown. 
The Greyhound station is at the other end of the 
pedestrian overpass. 
Looking west is more plain, with a long stretch of track ending by a curve to the right. 
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Frequent westbound CPR consists pass under the 
Calgary Transit overpass at SUNALTA, just west of downtown and the pedestrian bridge from which this 
view was taken, mere steps from the station front door. 
Two more mile-long CP consists followed in rapid 
succession within  30-minutes of this view around 
5:00 pm May 23rd, 2014.

In the background, the Calgary Tower and CP 
Corporate HQ on 9th Avenue SW, with CPR 
locomotive #29 on display in front of their building. 
(See the CPR page: http://yourrailwaypictures.com/CPRsteamengines/). 
If you have some time to spare between Greyhound 
buses, the overpass links the bus terminal with the 
LRT station. 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
CPR 9807 West passes under the newly-opened 
SUNALTA LRT station just west of downtown, just after dark; on January 2nd, 2013.
In the background, the Calgary Tower and CP 
Corporate HQ on 9th Avenue SW, with CPR
locomotive #29 on display in front of their building.
(See the CPR page: http://yourrailwaypictures.com/CPRsteamengines/)
If you have some time to spare between Greyhound buses, the overpass links the bus terminal with the LRT station. 
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones

 
Links
Visit our Home in Summerville Nova Scotia. This house was built in 1873.
Where we live and what we do
A Nova Scotia Snow Storm Hits Summerville
A Nova Scotia Snow Storm Hits Summerville
The Halifax & South-Western Museum
A tribute to the Steam Locomotives of the CNR
A tribute to the Steam Locomotives of the CPR
Robot Cars
The Old Railway Stations of Canada
Canadian Railway Artifacts
Old Canadian Diesels
   
Electric Locomotives and Street Cars
The Newfoundland Railway
Industrial and on Site Diesel  Locomotives
Old Canadian Rolling Stock Passenger Cars
Old Canadian Rolling Stock Freight Cars
The Scrap Yard
Canadian Old Logging Equipment
and Steam and Diesel Locomotives
The Grain Elevators of Western Canada
Canadian National Railways Motive Power Statistics Index
Railway Maintenance Equipment
And Old Railway Rolling Stock
Canadian Railway Tunnelswith a detailed look 
at the CPR Spiral Tunnels
Jerry Barnes' Garden Railway, The SCRR
The Nova Scotia Railway Heritage Society
The Nova Scotia Railway Heritage Society
Historic Aircraft Pictures
Visit John's Old Car and Truck Pictures
The Yard Limit's page on the
Windsor & Hantsport Railway (WHRC)
CN Pensioners' Association
The Stanley Steamer

For all you steam fans, this page is a must

Visit Lonnie Hedgepeth's
of Rocky Mount, North Carolina site.
He has used the plans provided on Covered Bridge Plans  webpage and is building a Covered Bridge for his
Live Steam train.
The building trades class at Darlington HS in Darlington, Wisconsin built this covered bridge for a local business man
 Tour the 64 remaining Covered Bridges
 of New Brunswick
The Covered Bridges that once
dotted Nova Scotia.
Lilies From the Valley
A Vast selection of Oriental and Asiatic previously cut commercially grown bulbs ready for shipment anywhere in Canada
Visit my Jeep page
A Picture Review of the Jeeps
from 1940 to the present
A Picture Review of the 
Nash, Hudson 
and the cars of American Motors
A Picture Review of the Hudsons and Terraplanes
that were found in Australia
A Picture Review Studebaker
A Picture review of the Packard
A Picture Review of the
Pickup Truck from 1940 to 1969
A Picture review of the Volkswagen
A Picture Tour of the Kaiser Frazer
A Picture Tour of the
A Picture Tour of the Henry J
A Picture Tour of the Crosley
A Picture Review of the Chevrolet
from 1916 tto 1970
A Picture Review of the Ford
from 1908 to 1969
The Chrysler Airflow
View some of John Evan's  Artwork
View some of
John' Evan's Artwork
This site has quite a collections 
of John's artwork.
View these old cars as you haven't before.
Eric Gordon's Kaiser Rebuild
There are many pictures showing the
details of this Rebuild
E Mail

 
 
 
 


Hits on this page


Total hits on the Railway pages



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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