Old Canadian Train Stations and Railway Yards
Western Canada
Alberta

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In an effort to make the station pages more on topic we decided 
to separate the Rail Yards, Freight Sheds, Water Towers and all 
other buildings that were not stations.
I hope you will appreciate what was done
Please use the link above to access these new pages

 

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Canadian Train Station pictures that they may have.
 


 

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Calgary's Heritage Park 

 
To view more of the park please click here

 
Shepard Station at Calgary's Heritage park,
1900 Heritage Drive SW. Shepard is still an active 
CPR point on their Brooks Sub between Medicine Hat 
and Calgary,(about 10 miles from Calgary's Alyth Yard).
The station, built in 1910, was donated to Heritage Park
by the CPR when it became vacant and now provides
visitors with ticket sales, food services, water fountain
and public washrooms. It is also wheelchair accessible.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones

 
CPR Station Lethbridge
A more formal name for the CPR station in Lethbridge at 801 – 1st Avenue South is “Union Station”, so called because the Canadian Pacific and the Alberta Railway and Irrigation Company jointly operated the building from its construction in 1906, up to 1912, when the Alberta Railway and Irrigation Company was dissolved and CPR took over sole ownership. For a period of time, the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway also maintained a freight office in the station.
Starting in 1895, CPR built a 1.5 mile spur from its Medicine Hat-Crownest mainline to serve the small village called Coalbanks and thus, avail themselves of a ready supply of coal from area mines for its locomotives. The Crownest area is situated where Southwestern Alberta, meets southeastern BC, close to the US border. (Coal mining is still ongoing in the area for the Asian markets and transported by long CPR unit trains of gondolas, to the Robert Bank Superport in the Greater Vancouver area;  through the Elk Valley towns of Elko, Fernie, Sparwood and others in Southern BC) on the Cranbrook Sub.
In 1905, Coalbanks changed its name to Lethbridge.  City fathers then encouraged the CPR to relocate its division point from Fort Macleod (further north towards Calgary) to Lethbridge with land and tax incentives. CPR then built their station in 1906, along with a freight shed and roundhouse; following the basic two-storey, Chateau-style railway station design used for their South Edmonton (Strathcona) and Red Deer stations featured on this page. It incorporates a hexagonal tower at the street entrance and dormers along the roof. Between 1907 and 1909, the spectacular CPR High Level Bridge was constructed (along with a smaller version near Monarch, featured on my Bridge page). 
It wasn’t until 1983 that the Lethbridge station was closed. In 1971, CPR abandoned RDC Dayliner passenger service to Calgary but still used the building as a freight depot for another 12 years. A 1977 study had meanwhile recommended that the CPR relocate its tracks away from the downtown core and move its rail yard. In 1980, CPR tracks were moved about a block north, while most of the railway operations centered at Kipp,  Mile 11.0 CPR Crownest Sub., about 5 miles northwest of Lethbridge towards Calgary. 
Today, what is left of Lethbridge Yard is at Mile 7.9 and serves only local industries. Whatever goes in and out of Lethbridge travels on the iconic CPR High Level Bridge, situated about 5 blocks or so west of the old station. Service in infrequent but some of the heavy haul (freight) goes through Lethbridge into the US.
The downtown area formerly occupied by the yard then became the Park Place Shopping Centre. Having lost its connection to the mainline, the old CPR station lost its purpose. So as not to lose a valuable historic asset, it was decided in 1986 to give the Lethbridge Union Station a second life by restoring it as the Lethbridge Community Health Centre. In May 1987, the building was declared a Provincial Historic Resource. 
To further enhance the city’s railway history, CPR locomotive 3651 (MLW 2-8-0) formerly displayed across the street on the north side of Galt Gardens and subject to frequent vandalism, was moved to the former station platform; where it is displayed today, restored behind a wrought iron fence (see my CPR locomotive page) . In 1988, CPR wooden caboose 437083 built in 1943, was added to the east side of the station to complete the setting. View it on my caboose page.

 
A plaque on the street side of the former Lethbridge
CPR Station honours its history.

It was formerly named "Union Station" because the Canadian Pacific Railway shared the building with the 
now defunct Alberta Railway and Irrigation Company
and the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.

The plaque mentions that "Since 1987, the building has 
been occupied by the Lethbridge Health Centre and 
CPR Consolidation 2-8-0 is positioned near the NW 
corner of the building and a refurbished caboose near 
the SE corner"

The locomotive and caboose are covered in other pages 
on this site.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The Lethbridge Station and caboose viewed from the southeast corner of Stafford Drive and 1st Avenue 
South on April 11th, 2014.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The former Lethbridge CPR station from across the 
street, looking northeast. A driveway at the end of the building leads into the Health Unit parking lot.

Park Lane Mall behind the station is now occupying a
great portion of where the yard used to be. A 1977
study recommended that the yard be relocated to
Kipp, some 5 miles northwest and the tracks be moved
about a block north of the station. They are still in use, 
daily for freight shipment to and from the US.

To the extreme left, the stone monument bearing
plaques set in front of Consolidation 3651, covered in 
my CPR locomotive page,  http://yourrailwaypictures.com/CPRsteamengines/

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The sun came out to show us a nice portion of the
former CPR Lethbridge station from across
1st Street North.

After being refurbished inside, the building became designated as a provincial historical site. While it is
open to the public, there are no railway artifacts inside 
but a CPR Consolidation sits behind the former station 
at the west end on static display and a 1943 wooden
caboose flanks the east end.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The centre portion of the former Lethbridge CPR station.

Notice the iconic octagonal tower, and the row or 
dormers familiar in prairie stations, such as Edmonton, 
Red Deer and Saskatoon. In 1987 the building became
the Lethbridge Health Unit after being vacant for
some time, when CP moved its yard to Kipp, about
5 miles northwest and relocated the mainline about 
a block north.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The end of the former freight shed at the west end of the station. At the turn of the 20th Century, the freight shed 
of Union Station as it was known then; was shared by the Canadian Pacific, the Alberta Railway and Irrigation Company and for a while, the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway.

Notice Consolidation locomotive CPR 3651 to the 
extreme left. It was moved to the site in 1987, after
having been displayed in Galt Gardens across the street since 1964. Wooden caboose 437083 (built in 1943) was added at the other end of the building in 1988, to 
complete the setting.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
To the left, the main door looking west behind the
station, which led passengers to the platform, to catch 
the Canadian Pacific Railway “Dayliner” (RDC) to
Calgary up to 1971, when service was abandoned. 
The station continued with freight service until 1980 
when the tracks which used to run where the newer 
portion now stand, were moved about a block north.

The door into the new portion leads into the health
centre and the other side gives into the parking lot 
and the rear of Consolidation locomotive CPR 3651.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Let's go back almost 50 years to 1966  when this
station was a beehive of activity
Looking east across 1st Avenue South, we now have
a close-up of the Lethbridge Union Station in 1966 
when it was in use. More at  https://hermis.alberta.ca/ARHP/Details.aspx?DeptID

Notice the way that the cars are parked in front of the
station, a hold-over in the three Western provinces, 
of when horses were tied to hitching posts in front of buildings.

CPR wooden caboose 437083 built in 1943, was added 
to the right side on its own bit of track in 1988 . 
See my caboose page.

Massey F. Jones collection
A 1966 view looking east,  of the Lethbridge, Alberta
CPR station; at 801 1st Avenue South. 

Built in 1905-1906, the CPR station closed in 1983,
when a study recommended relocation of CPR yard operations to Kipp, some 15 miles west. Following
renovation and now having been designated as a
historic site, the building became occupied by the 
Lethbridge Community Health Centre.

The bridge to the far right is Stafford Drive North, 
which spanned the yard but is now a wider concrete 
structure with a couple of tracks running under,
which see occasional traffic.

Massey F. Jones collection
The CPR Lethbridge station freight shed, looking 
northeast in 1966, with active rolling stock still
behind the station.

In 1980, an agency was established to relocate the
yard to Kipp, a few miles west of Lethbridge City 
Centre.  The tracks were moved further north and
the area redeveloped into a shopping mall and 
residential complex.

After  the was station was preserved, CPR locomotive 
3651 (MLW 2-8-0) was relocated from Galt Park 
across the street, to a position where the boxcar now 
sits on the extreme left of this picture, to enhance the Lethbridge railway heritage.

Massey F. Jones collection
Only a very simple white sign under the octagonal tower 
in the CPR 'Script Lettering', marked the main entrance
to the Lethbridge Canadian Pacific Station this 1966 view.

Passenger service was abandoned in 1971 and freight 
operations relocated to Kipp, some distance west of
downtown in the 1980s. http://www.lethbridge.ca/Doing-Business/Planning-
Development/Documents/Railway%20
Relocation%20ARP.pdf

Early 20th Century views of the Lethbridge 
Union Station  : http://www.canadarail.com/alberta/l/lethbridge
.html#.VBpClGfwtko

Massey F. Jones collection
Consolidation CPR 3651  (MLW 2-8-0) relocated from 
Galt Gardens across the street in 1987 is now displayed
to the rear of the former Lethbridge station, almost
where the mainline used to run, in this view looking w
est on March 11th, 2014.

The large building in front of the locomotive is the
Chapters store and Michaels is in the background,
both within the Park Place Mall, which replaced the 
CPR yard, when it was moved to Kipp. The
locomotive is prominently featured on my CPR 
steam locomotive page http://yourrailwaypictures.com
/CPRsteamengines/

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The Calgary-Lethbridge passenger service, from 
CPR public timetable April 30th, 1967 to October 28th, 
1967 (during Expo 67). Out of Calgary for the first
6 miles, the RDC followed the route of the present 
Calgary Transit south LRT line (yet to be constructed),

Passenger service between the two cities was 
abandoned in 1971, although occasional freight 
service still exists.

Massey F. Jones collection
Another RDC service to Lethbridge, this one 
designed for a fast connection on "The Canadian"
to and from Montreal, during Expo 67.

As with the Calgary-Lethbridge elsewhere on the 
page, this CPR timetable is their listing dated 
30 Apr 1967 to 28 October, 1967.

Massey F. Jones collection
Stirling Station Construction Crew 1900

.
The Stirling station is along the old Lethbridge Great Falls subdivision at Stirling. The CPR built a new station beside the new Railway town of Maybutt, Alberta when the old
Galt Railway station site was to small for CPR when the 
took over the Alberta Irrigation Railway and Coal Co.
The Station although located in Maybutt, Alberta 
remained under the name Stirling as Stirling was located 
1km south of the new town of Maybutt.

These photos are from the Stirling Historical Society and we submitted by 
Cody Kapcsos
The Stirling Station and grain elevators, year unknown
These photos are from the Stirling Historical Society and we submitted by 
Cody Kapcsos
Stirling Scouts at Station, Stirling Alta. Date Unknown
These photos are from the Stirling Historical Society and we submitted by 
Cody Kapcsos
1920s Flood Maybutt, Alta
These photos are from the Stirling Historical Society and we submitted by 
Cody Kapcsos
Winnifred, Alberta Station. Year unknown
This picture was submitted by Cody Kapcsos
Moving the Winnifred, Alberta Station, newspaper clipping 
about the move of the station in 1961.
The stastion  burned in the  1970s because of the deteriorated condition of the building.
This picture was submitted by Cody Kapcsos
CP Station Granum, AB (1904 CPR Station, Model 12)
This picture was taken and submitted by Al MacDonald, Granum AB
CP Station Granum, AB (1904 CPR Station, Model 12)
This picture was taken and submitted by Al MacDonald, Granum AB
CP Station Granum, AB (1904 CPR Station, Model 12)
This picture was taken and submitted by Al MacDonald, Granum AB
CP Station Granum, AB (1904 CPR Station, Model 12)
This picture was taken and submitted by Al MacDonald, Granum AB
The above station is now the home of Al MacDonald. It was purchased from the CPR some 36 years ago and moved to it's present location, about 2km from its original site (Granum AB, between Calgary and Lethbridge). Al has lived in it for the past 20 years. 
"The station was modified to make it into a home, and since I've lived here I've tried to make every change more like a CPR station instead of less.  Unfortunately my hands are a bit tied in that I don't know exactly what it was supposed to look like.  I managed to find an old CPR maintenance shed that I moved onto the property for my hobby machine shop.  It's long and skinny like "the house." modified the north end of the building, which was originally the warehouse area (and later converted into a double garage by the previous owner) into my 1-man sewing shop.  One day I heard a car door slam and outside were a number of elderly people.  I asked if I could help them out and one said they would like to take a picture of the station.  "sure, knock yourself out".  One of the ladies said she was born in the building and her Dad was the stationmaster for 42 years.  She was immediately invited in and we had a great chat.  She came back a couple of months later with her sister who was also born in the building.  They were like a couple of school girls, looking all around the building and trying to remember where everything was.  Very rewarding.

 
The Calgary CPR station on  9 Avenue looking east, 
from an old photo in Massey's collection.

We could date the photo to about 1910. The passenger
station is in the middle and CPR freight sheds on
either side. The building was demolished to make way
for the Husky Tower (now Calgary Tower), which
opened in 1967 as a centennial project.

The CPR station was then located in the basement of
the tower and subsequently used by VIA until January
1990 and then briefly by Rocky Mountaineer train.

To the right of the station is what is now the Fairmount Palliser Hotel (ex-CPR), which will celebrate its 
centennial in 2014.

Submitted by Massey F. Jones
This picture was submitted by Massey F. Jones
This picture was submitted by Massey F. Jones
This picture was submitted by Massey F. Jones
The Canadian Northern Railway (CNoR) station at
141 18 Ave SW  (in the Calgary Mission District) is a
locally-quarried three-story sandstone structure 
constructedin 1905 as a parish hall for the St Mary's
RC church next door at a cost of $14,304.  It seated
500 and was used as a church community hall for concerts theatrical plays and other functions such as a 
Ukrainian centre. 
From 1907 to 1910, the basement served as a classes
for the the St. Mary's Boys School. 
 
 
 

During the real estate boom 1911, the building was sold 
to the Canadian Northern Railway for $60,000 for use
as an office,since they had decided to relocate to Calgary,
in competitionwith the Canadian Pacific Railway 
(CPR) in the downtown core
(at 9 Ave x Centre St) and the Grand Trunk Pacific,
where Fort Calgary is now located
(very roughly 9 Ave x 8 St SE). 
 
 
 

In addition to the building, the Canadian Northern 
Railway purchased the Lindsay property to the south 
across the Elbow River and set up the McKee 
yard (freight) yard, which 
had 10 tracks and facilities, on what is today the 
City of Calgary Lindsay Park, across the road from
the present Calgary Stampede Grounds. 
 
 
 

A separate building had been planned as a station but 
WW1 looming, ended the expansion plans. By 1913, 
Canadian Northern decided by to use the building as
a railway station. It built a steel bridge across the
Elbow River in 1914 to link the station on the
north side, to their McKee Yard, on the south side 
constructed the year before and now finished. 

See my bridge page: http://yourrailwaypictures.com/TrainBridges/index
Central.html
 
 
 
 

The bottom pictures show the CNoR station with 
CNoR 2141 
at the platform


 
CNoR Station Calgary 

The first passenger train arrived sometime in the
fall of 1915. By 1916,
it had become the Calgary terminus for runs from 
Edmonton 
through Drumheller  (The Goose Lake Line
http://forgottenalberta.com/2010/01/15/goose-lake-line
is-on-the-chopping-block/) and Edmonton via Three Hills
and 
Mirror in North Central Alberta. See map at
http://www.forthjunction.com/passenger-rail.htm
By June 1919, Canadian National Railways (CN) 
assumed ownership when they incorporated the Canadian 
Northern. The station closed July 5, 1971, with the
departure of the last Railiner (RDC car)
for Edmonton.
The building sat vacant until 1979, when it was purchased 
by the
City of Calgary. In 1981, it was named a Provincial Historic
Resource of Alberta. 

Around 1984, Calgary City Ballet (now Alberta Ballet) 
leased the facility. Fire ravaged the building in  August 1985. 
Living nearby  at the time, Massey recorded the incident 
shown here. 
The building sat as a burned out hulk until renovated in 1987 
with funding from the Nat Christie Foundation and, since 1991,
the Nat Christie Centre has been home to the Alberta Ballet. 

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The Canadian Northern Railway station at 141 18 Ave SW 
in Calgary, after fire damage in August 1985 during renovation. 
Thanks to funding from The Nat Christie Foundation, the
building had been totally rebuilt by 1987, as seen in a 
companion picture.
 This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones  
Looking northwest.
Compare this view with the photo of the
restored building below.
 This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones  
The first passenger train arrived mid-1915 and improvements
were made to the building by 1916, by adding a trackside canopy 
and brick express structure (in typical railway architecture). 
Designed with a "boomtown baroque: classical facade and 
style reminiscent of French Canadian architecture, the St Mary 
parish hall was erected in 1905 at a cost of $14,304 and used
for social, theatrical and athletic activities.

In 1911, the building was purchased by the Canadian 
Northern Railway for $60,000. By June 1919, Canadian
National Railways assumed ownership of the station and 
rail lines, when the company absorbed Canadian Northern.
The last train departed for Edmonton on July 5, 1971, 
after which the station closed. 

The City of Calgary then acquired the building in 1978 but
fire gutted the structure in August 1985 during renovations
and it stood vacant behind a heavy wooden fence until 1987,
when major renovation were completed; including two large 
dance studios, with funding from the Nat Christie Foundation.
No detail was spared to ensure an accurate historical 
restoration of the building. Here, we see what can be done 
to an old building, using modern materials. 

The 1916 brick portion in the back now houses the wardrobe
department, in a building that is now "The Nat Christie Centre"
and  home to the Alberta Ballet. The view looks north from 
the edge of the downtown core, in an area formerly called 
"Rouleauville, the former "French Quarter" of Calgary.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A view looking south toward the Elbow River Bridge, 
crossed by Canadian Northern Railway (CNorR) locomotives,
later CN, until 1971 when the building was abandoned.
Beyond the gates in the background are the original tracks, going
into what used to be the CNorR yard. They have been  preserved 
into  the bridge as an historical artifact.

The train, which came into the station facing northbound, was
uncoupled from its locomotive, brought into the yard and thn 
backed into the station for the next trip.
The loco meanwhile was serviced, wyed and recoupled, now
facing southbound for the next trip outbound, over the bridge.

The bridge (covered later into the "Bridge page") is now part
of Calgary's Lindsay Park used by pedestrians and cyclists.
Lindsay Park (on the other side of the road from the Calgary
Stampede grounds) was formed when the old yards were 
reclaimed and features an aquatic centre and footpaths. 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
In the background, the refurbished Canadian Northern
Station, used by the Canadian National Railways until 1971
It is now used by the Alberta Ballet and called the
Nat Christie Centre. 
Nat Christie was a Calgary horse breeder and businessman.

Note the proximity to the Calgary Tower and Calgary's
famous bird: the construction crane.
The dark brown building in the background is the former 
Petro Canada HQ building.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The rear of the CNR Station on July 18th 1966, 
while still in use.
Passenger service was discontinued in 1970
Photo: A.H. (Al) Cloverdale through Lorne Unwin Massey F. Jones collection.  
Another view of the Canadian Northern Railway
Station freight shed from a colour slide, about
1978-1979, after it was closed but the tracks not yet 
lifted, following  purchase by the City of Calgary.

The building was declared a Provincial Historic Site
in 1981 and the Calgary City Ballet leased the facility 
in 1984 but during renovation in 1985, it accidentally 
caught fire late one night and was totally gutted.
Photos in this series show the damage and 
subsequent reconstruction.

 Massey F. Jones collection  
CN Station at Hanna, AB, June 26 2014
The former Canadian Northern Railway Station at Hanna
was constructed in 1913 and served to provide both
passenger and freight service until August, 1990.
Due to its historical significance, it was decided to
restore and relocate the Station to serve as the Town's
new Tourist Center.
 This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Booth, Willingdon AB  
The former CN station at Hanna at 603 South Municipal Road 
is now the town's Visitor Information Centre.

The building was constructed in 1913 on the Canadian 
Northern Railway (CnoR) Goose Lake Line from Saskatoon 
to Calgary. Eventually acquired by CN, Hanna became a 
divisional point until 1900, second only to Edmonton.

Hanna is located in East-Central Alberta approximately 2 hours
north-east of Calgary.

 Massey F. Jones collection  
The station at Cereal is now a museum. Cereal is a village in
East Central Alberta established in 1910 near Drumheller by the 
Canadian Northern Railway (CNoR) now CN, to transport local 
crops (mainly wheat and barley). 
Like the Hanna station on this page, it was situated on the 
Goose Lake Line from Saskatoon to Calgary. 
The view is dated somewhere in the 70s when the station 
was being refurbished.

See the station in use at https://hermis.alberta.ca/PAA/Photo
GalleryDetails.aspx?ObjectID=A15100&dv=True

An excellent front view in more recent time https://www.
flickr.com/photos/mccormickphotography/5604208465

Massey F. Jones collection   
Street view from the street of the former Claresholm, Alberta 
CPR station at 5126 - 1 Street W, Claresholm on 27 April 1985.

It was constructed in 1910-11 from half of the former
Calgary station (shown on this page) by dismantling the 
1893 station 
stone and by stone and using half to build a station at 
Claresholm and the other half to build a station in High River
which is now the Museum of the Highwood (also shown here). 
The Claresholm station opened in 1912 and operated as a
train station until it closed in 1965.

The City of Claresholm leased, then purchased the building 
and several uses were proposed, including a library. In 1969 
it was decided to convert it to a museum and community 
centre, a use which continues to this day. The small building
on the right of the photo is Claresholm's first school (1903).

 Massey F. Jones collection  
Trackside view of the former Claresholm, Alberta station
after it became a museum. The track originally connected 
Calgary to Lethbridge through High River and Fort 
Macleod as a secondary line.

Although the CPR abandoned passenger service in 1965,
the railway continued to serve Claresholm until about 1971. 
About late 1990, freight service did not warrant keeping
that portion of the Macleod Sub open and it ceased to exist.

 Massey F. Jones collection  
Trackside view of the former Claresholm, Alberta station after 
it became a museum. The track originally connected Calgary to
Lethbridge through High River and Fort Macleod as a
secondary line.

Although the CPR abandoned passenger service in 1965, 
the railway continued to serve Claresholm until about 1971. 
About late 1990, freight service did not warrant keeping that 
portion of the Macleod Sub open and it ceased to exist.

 Massey F. Jones collection  
CNR Station Vermillion AB
Vermillion AB station. Vermilion AB is the first division
point east of Edmonton AB on the old Cdn. Northern main
line between Winnipeg and Vancouver.
This picture was submitted by Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba
CNR Station Vermillion AB
This station was the original Vermillion Station and
was moved to a new location in 1987 and is part of a 
recreational facility
 This picture was taken and submitted by Gary Paul  
A Plaque showing the contributors to the moving of the
Vermillion Station
 This picture was taken and submitted by Gary Paul  
CNR Station Wainwright AB
Wainwright AB is the first division point east of 
Edmonton on what was once the main line of the Grand
Trunk Pacific Rwy's between Winnipeg and Prince Rupert. 
This line is now the main line of the CNR between 
Winnipeg, Vancouver and Prince Rupert
This picture was submitted by Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba
CNR Station Wainwright AB
This picture was submitted by Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Via Station Wainwright AB
This picture was submitted by Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba
CPR Station Retlaw AB.
c.1920's. Courtesy of the Retlaw historical society.
This picture was submitted by Arthur Grieve, Winnipeg, Manitoba
exCNoR Station Rowley AB

Rowley station undergoing renovations prior to 1989 and 
use on the Alberta Prairie excursions.

Rowley station is now,  believed to be virtually abandoned.. 
When Rail America bought the Central Western Railway, on 
which both of the stations were, things changed drastically 
for both the Central Western Railway (CWRL) and
Alberta Prairie (APXX)

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Rowley station undergoing renovations prior to 1989
and use on the Alberta Prairie excursions. 
 This picture was submitted by Dale Redekopp St. Albert, AB  

 exCNoR Station Rowley AB
Note the pine tree beside the station.
This picture was taken on  August 2010
 Photo: L. Unwin collection This picture was submitted by Massey Jones  
The former station at MIRROR, northeast of Red Deer, 
in Central Alberta.

The building was constructed in 1911 to serve the
Grand Trunk Pacific (eventually CN) and was at one time
a divisional point between Edmonton and Calgary. 

Stucco cement was applied to the outside of the station in 
1944. The building was destroyed by fire in 1975 and not
replaced.

This photo is undated but most probably taken in the
mid-1960s when there was a lot of activity on the CN 
Three Hills Sub, as evidenced by the tracks.
The Three Hills Sub is still in use for transporting freight 
on the CN between Calgary and Edmonton. It's alternate
for freight on the CP, is the Red Deer Sub.

Massey F. Jones collection  
CPR (VIA) Station Red Deer AB

This station is no longer in use as such, after VIA withdrew 
service between Calgary and Edmonton. CP now used
a brand new yard, 
just out of town. The station may be of further use though, as 
there is a "bullet train" service planned for the busy Calgary-Edmonton corridor but the financing and final route
remain to be determined.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
CPR Station Red Deer AB
A trackside view taken October 1989. The rail no longer runs 
adjacent to the station, as a new CPR yard was constructed to
bypass the city, while this photo was being taken. The station
was abandoned shortly thereafter and sat deserted.
In May 1991, the station was designated as a municipal heritage resource by Red Deer City council. The Province of Alberta 
made it a Provincial Historic Resource in April 1993. In 1995, the
station was purchased by a private concern, restored to its
former appearance and now houses law and real estate offices.
This picture taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The CN Station at Red Deer Alberta to the right, 
built in 1923 and demolished in 1960. It had ticket 
office, waiting rooms, toilets, baggage and express
and the second floor was the agent's residence. 
The last regular train used the station in 1955. 
After CN relocated its tracks more to the north,
the station land was redeveloped as the Co-Op 
shopping Centre.
Since the GMD-1 was built in 1959 and the station
demolished in 1960, we have to date the photo to
that period.
 Massey F. Jones collection  
Former CP C&E South Edmonton, AB
Now The Iron Horse Restaurant and Bar
This picture was submitted by Dave Savage/CRSN   www.railwaystationnews.ca
 A clear trackside view of the South Edmonton (Strathcona) CPR/VIA station, about mid-70s.
 Massey F. Jones collection  
The CPR Flag Stop at KANANASKIS, a short 50 miles
west of Calgary, near Canmore, Alberta in the 
Canadian Rockies

This is a perfect example of a portable station just dropped trackside by the CPR, with a bit of additional construction afterwards.

 Glenbow Archives – Massey F. Jones collection  
CP Banff, AB Now a Restaurant and Tourist Train Station
This picture was submitted by Dave Savage/CRSN   www.railwaystationnews.ca
 A  street view of the CPR/VIA station at Banff, Alberta
early '80s. "The Caboose" restaurant to the right has
since gone out of business.
 Photo: Massey F. Jones  
CPR Banff AB Station, 1942
This picture was taken by Tim Croft's The picture was taken 
by his father in law, Sydney Taylor in 1942  when he was on
his way to Raf Penhold (Red Deer AB) flight training school.
 The picture was submitted by Tim Croft from the UK.   
CPR Laggan Station. This was the original
Lake Louise Station
This picture was taken between 1977 and 1985
This station was moved to Calagary's Heritage Park in 1976
 This picture was take and submitted by Etienne Ozorak, Sacramento, California  
CPR Lake Louise Station
This picture was taken between 1977 and 1985
 This picture was take and submitted by Etienne Ozorak, Sacramento, California  
 CPP Lake Louise station, when it was still in use in the mid-80s when this photo was taken, as evidenced by the 
arrivals/departures sign still affixed to the wall.

This view looks east from the "High Line", a slight grade 
used by westbound trains, while the track shown here by the 
station is used by eastbound consists, CPR heavy haul trains continue to use the

Still in use today, the former station is now converted to an
upscale lineside restaurant http://www.lakelouisestation.com/ , When Massey last visited the area, there was a passenger car
(CP Delamere),  parked on static display to the right, for 
special functions.

 This picture taken and was submitted by Massey F. Jones  
Lake Louise Station looking west in the late-70s, see the 
VIA sign on the door.

The station was the second building erected on the site, the
first one (Laggan Station) is now  in service in original 
condition at Heritage Park in Calgary (view my page). 
This second building was used by CPR for a number of 
years on the Montreal-Vancouver mainline, then by VIA
Rail and is now The Lake Louise Railway Station & 
Restaurant, an upscale facility.

 This picture taken and was submitted by Massey F. Jones  
South Edmonton VIA Station formally 
The Strathcona Canadian Pacific Railway Station
The Strathcona Canadian Pacific Railway Station was built
by the Calgary and Edmonton Railway in what was then the City of Strathcona, Alberta. It was started in 1907, completed in1908, and expanded in 1910, and is located at what is now 8101 Gateway Boulevard, just south of Whyte Avenue.The building was initially the northern terminus of the Calgary and Edmonton Railway serving Strathcona and Edmonton, although Canadian Pacific later expanded that line north across the North Saskatchewan
River via the High Level Bridge into Edmonton proper. 
The building was designated a Canadian Heritage Railway
Station in 1991,when it was still owned by CP and therefore subjectto federal regulation. After being sold by CP it was designated a Municipal Historic 
Resource in 2003, and a Provincial Historic Resource in 2004

Since 1998, the building has been home to the I
ron Horse Night Club, one of Edmonton's largest and oldestnightclubs, with two levels, eights bars, four rooms, a dance floor, and a stage; it hosts over one thousand people on an average nightDescription from http://en.wikipedia.org

This picture taken and was submitted by Massey F. Jones
South Edmonton VIA Station

This is a rare event, as the RDC had a problem and an FP unit
from Calgary was used instead, on the Calgary-Edmonton run
for a week or so.

This picture taken and was submitted by Massey F. Jones
A good sketch of the CPR Strathcona station in
South Edmonton, described fully on this page.
 Massey F. Jones Collection  
Calgary & Edmonton Railway Station, Edmonton, Alberta

The building (now a museum) at 10447-86 Ave, is a replica of the original station which served Edmonton from 1891-1907 and
features numerous railway and station artifacts as well as an extensive historic photograph collection. The building is open
to the public and there is a small admission fee.

This picture taken and was submitted by Massey F. Jones
Calgary & Edmonton Railway Station, Edmonton, Alberta

Behind the building by the crossbucks is the the old CPR line to 
Old Strathcona, over the High Level Bridge (see my Bridge page). 
The CPR stopped running trains over the upper deck in 1989 
from a yard of what is now Grant McEwan Community College, 
to the Old Strathcona (South Edmonton) CPR station (
see my Station page) .

Currently, the Edmonton Railway Society (ERRS) runs one of
their restored tramways on the line, first over the
High Level Bridge, then through a short tunnel under a housing project, to their shops 
behind Old Strathcona Market, about 2.5 Km.
The service started in 1997 from Grandin (near theAlberta Legislature Building ) and was extended to Jasper Avenue in
2005.
The downtown terminus for the tramway is located between 
109 St & 110 St at 100 Ave, just a few streets beyond some
major downtown hotels, near Corona LRT station 

Operations take place  from the May Long wekend to (Canadian) Thanksgiving weekend (May-October). 
Running on the hour and the half hour, the round trip adult fare is currently about $4.00, purchased from the conductor and 
allowing stopovers. 
There are also family and group fares.

Close to 50,000 passengers are carried in an average year
The Edmonton Radial Railway Society, composed entirely of volunteers also operates the streetcars at Fort Edmonton.
http://www.edmonton-radial-railway.ab.ca/highlevelbridge
/schedule_hlb

This picture taken and was submitted by Massey F. Jones
 CNoR (CN) Viking  station at 5001 51 Avenue, 
Viking, Alberta
  Massey F. Jones Collection  
 The baggage shed end of the former CNoR (CN)
Viking  station at 5001 51 Avenue, Viking, Alberta
 Massey F. Jones Collection  
Situated half-way between Calgary and Red Deer at mileage
46.4 CP Red Deer Sub, Didsbury station was built in 1904 to replace a temporary structure and the addition built in 1907.
It was first used by the Calgary & Edmonton Railway (C&E)
and later the CPR.

The building was retired in 1977 and donated to the town in
1991, turned 180 degrees around and restored. Now a
provincial historic site at 1811 – 20 St in Didsbury, it serves 
a community hall. The car which is angle-parked in front of
the building is a leftover from the days when cowboys tied
their horses to a hitching post.

Massey F. Jones collection   
A close-up of the former Didsbury, Alberta CPR station.

A good side view of the main building is at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Didsbury,_Alberta#mediaviewer
/File:Alberta_mainstreet_Didsbury_RR_station_016.jpg

The Red Deer Sub between Calgary and Edmonton runs 
near the building but CPR trains do not stop there anymore 
as the structure has become a community hall housing the 
Chamber of Commerce, as well as Scouts and Guides and
other organizations.

Massey F. Jones collection   
The Delburne, Alberta station was built in 1911 by the 
Grand Trunk Pacific (GTP) as a Type E station, like many 
in the area. The wood siding (common with stations of the day), 
was coated with stucco in 1922. With discontinuation of
passenger service to the area in 1971, the station fell into
disuse and stood vacant for several years. It was then moved a
few blocks and became part of the Antony Hendy Museum in 
1978, along with a water tower and other artifacts. Some of 
the artifacts are housed in the water tower.

The museum is located east of Red Deer AB on off 
Highway 21; coordinates N 52° 11.836 W 113° 14.345. 
It is only opened July and August but other times by 
appointment. Not all artifacts are railway-related but 
there's a caboose and a Fairmount speeder on the grounds. Admission is by donation. http://www.unlockthepast.ca/places/Anthony-
Henday-Museum_8265

This picture taken and was submitted by Massey F. Jones
The station sign on each side of the former CN (now VIA Rail) station at Jasper, Alberta. The station serves transcontinental passengers each way 3 times a week and also those, to and from Prince Rupert BC.  The Rocky Mountaineer also uses it during summer as a terminal to and from Vancouver via Kamloops.
 This picture taken and was submitted by Massey F. Jones  
The VIA station at 607 Connaught Drive in downtown Jasper, Alberta has been serving passengers since it was constructed by the CNR in 1926.

This view looks east in June 2009. 

This picture taken and was submitted by Massey F. Jones
Jasper station, situated in the National Park of the same
name,  was declared a heritage railway station by the 
federal government in 1992. This view looks west from 
the other side of Connaught Drive in June 2009. 
This picture taken and was submitted by Massey F. Jones
Jasper VIA Station trackside.

The photo was taken May 1st, 2009
The train is the VIA #1 (westbound) to Vancouver,
which has just arrived around 2:30pm.

View the "Canadian", led by VIA 6419 and
VIA 6445, entering Jasper on May 3rd, 2009.

Massey and wife subsequently boarded the train to 
Vancouver. Share with him a 20-minute video ride 
from the rear dome; between Jasper, Alberta and 
Kamloops, BC. On the way, the passenger train takes 
the hole for a couple of meets with eastbound CN freights.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQVB2YkFClc&lis

 

This picture taken and was submitted by Massey F. Jones
CN Jasper Station Interior showing the 
VIA Counter, June 2009
This picture taken and was submitted by Massey F. Jones
CN/VIA  Jasper Station July 2011
This picture was taken and submitted by Corey Walker, Prince George, BC
Big Valley Station

This station islocated in central Alberta. The Village of 
Big Valley is located south of Stettler. This photo shows
the refurbished station. It is still a destination for the
Alberta Prairie Railway Excursions. 

This picture taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Big Valley  CN station, 32 km south of Stettler AB,  as it 
was in 1989 prior to preservation by the Canadian Northern
Society and use by the Alberta Prairie Railway Excursions.
The adjacent roundhouse ruin, shown below is on the list 
of Canada's Historic Places.
Photo: L. Unwin Submitted, Collection  Massey F. Jones
Big Valley CN station, taken in May 1997
This picture was taken and submitted by Wayne Anderson, Lethbridge Alberta  
ELSDESOR Junction, near Drumheller AB in the Badlands 
area, which is 75 million years old.

The proper name should have been "Eladesor", which is 
Rosedale spelled backwards.
(I took a long magnified look to make sure there was no error 
on the signpost) A five kilometer drive east from the Drumheller 
town center, Rosedale lies at the convergence of the Rosebud 
and Red Deer Rivers and Eladesor is nearby..
http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&tab=wl&q=Rosedale%
2C%20AB

The railway served the Atlas Coal Mine, a wooden tipple,
now fully restored and a Historic Site open to visits. 
The photo was taken circa 1984 before everything became restored.
You can look up the history of this interesting area at 
http://www.atlascoalmine.ab.ca/history.html

The whole area and attractions are described at:
http://www.dinosaurrvpark.ca/Drumheller_Final-web.pdf

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The CPR Pavilion over 1st St SW in downtown Calgary, is 
where passengers can board the Empress 2816 and the Royal Canadian Pacific luxury train. 
Passengers staying at  the multi-star Fairmount Palliser
Hotel on the left can connect  directly to the "Great Hall" 
boarding area to  the right,  through the glassed portion. 
The pavilion is built on a bridge that supported the
first construction train west in 1885.
The  Royal Canadian Pacific offices at 201 9th Ave SW,
to the right, were formerly occupied by the Calgary
headquarters of Canada Post.
The building was totally gutted and rebuilt to modern
standards, complete with an upscale waiting area and
historic CPR railway artifacts on the first floor
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The skeleton of the Canadian Pacific Great Hall rotunda; 
seen from the back on July 23rd, 1999 during construction.
The Great hall, seen elsewhere on the page, is to the left.

This view looks north towards the downtown core and the 
CPR trans-continental mainline from Calgary to Vancouver 
is in the foreground. 

 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
A view from the inside of the Great Hall of the 
Royal Canadian Pacific, showing part of the 12 meter 
high glass rotunda, built around 2000 over an existing
street bridge. Reflected in the glass to the right is the 
adjacent Palliser Hotel to the left, which accommodates the 
RCP guests prior to departure. The Great Hall is connected
directly to the hotel for catering and guest departure.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Canadian Pacific Railway FP7 1401 (GMD 1953)

"The Great Hall", a 152m wing (just short of 500 ft), where 
the Royal Canadian Pacific is stored, when in Calgary. 
This photo was taken on November 5th, 2011.

The area can accomodate up to 80 people for seated dining 
and about 200 people for weddings etc.
Catering is provided by the adjacent multi-star Palliser Hotel. 
View their interesting website.
Trips on the Royal Canadian Pacific are in the upper
four-figure range, with onboard stateroom and
showers. Accomodation  is limited to 32 guests, 
each receiving
VIP treatment throughout the consistof 10 fully
restored (1916-1931) Canadian Pacific
business cars . 
http://www.royalcanadianpacific.com/
http://www.royalcanadianpacific.com

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The wrought iron artwork under the CPR Pavilion 
in 1st St SW underpass.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The wrought iron artwork under the CPR Pavilion
in 1st St SW underpass.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The wrought iron artwork under the CPR Pavilion
in 1st St SW underpass.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The wrought iron artwork under the CPR Pavilion
in 1st St SW underpass.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The citations are clipped to the side of the
Royal Canadian Pacific offices.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The citations are clipped to the side of the 
Royal Canadian Pacific offices.
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
 The Royal Canadian Pacific Station at 201 - 9th Avenue
SW in Calgary, a block west of the Calgary Tower. 

The Royal Canadian Pacific is a luxury train accommodating
a very limited amount of passengers (around 30), all over 18. 
The trip is in the very high 4-figures and VIP treatment is the absolute norm. Read about the VIP accommodation at http://www.royalcanadianpacific.com/accommodations.html

Entering the station door and turning right  leads into the 
Great Hall, featured on this page and on the Old Diesel page. 
Turning left leads into  "The Rotunda", linking the Great Hall 
to the Fairmount Palliser a multi-star hotel, where guests
stay overnight,  before departure the next morning. 

Trips are always carried in daylight, with overnight stops at 
selected high-end lodging (such as ranches) depending upon the
trip chosen and  suitable VIP meals throughout the trip .
Side trips are included for golfing, fishing or visit to notable sites. 
One is the Canadian Museum of Rail Travel in Cranbrook BC http://www.trainsdeluxe.com/
The train then proceeds to Lethbridge and the High Level 
Bridge featured on the bridge page. On a couple of plans,
the last night is spent inside the train on a rail siding near 
Calgary and it enters the city about 10 am.

The Royal Canadian Pacific train features  restored FP9 
diesels and Tuscan red heavyweight "heritage cars", 
all of them rebuilt to modern standards and former opulence,
all of them used by CPR top executives at one time. 
The tail end car features the old style observation gallery, 
opened to the outside, allowing gusts to enjoy the mountain 
air, as in the old days. Some of the rolling stock and motive
power is covered in my pages.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones  
Just off the street east of the main entrance at the base of  the Calgary Tower on 9  Ave x Centre Street is the Rocky 
Mountaineer Station. Notice the  Tower curvature.

Next to the Royal Canadian Pacific luxury trip, the Rocky Mountaineer is the best choice, from Calgary to Vancouver
or the other way around, called "First Passage to the West". 
The trip features 3 classes of travel, depending on the fare. 
Gold Leaf passengers ride in a full upper dome, which
features a dining room at the lower level with meals served 
at the table. The class also has other amenities. 
The  "First Passage to the West" is "all-daylight" trip, with
an overnight stop at Kamloops BC overnight, where guests are accommodated in local hotels, again comfort depending
on the travel class, with  all hotels and gratuities included in 
the fare.  http://www.rockymountaineer.com/en_CA_AB/

While stored in Calgary, trains normally head straight to 
Banff during the season April-October, except Wednesdays, 
when they stop at this station to pick up passengers.
After a short stay in the waiting room, guests pass through a 
door around the far side of the counter and  directly to the track. Departure from Calgary is around 6:30 am, in order to reach
Banff by 8:00 am and board the rest of the guests, most
of whom are tour groups. Travel is then non-stop to Kamloops.

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones  
CPR # 144 at Calgary station.
The caption states that the first passenger train reached 
Calgary Aug 1883. 
This is the second station in Calgary (the first was a boxcar).
Both buildings were eventually taken down when a much larger  station was built a block further west. One  building then became 
the High River CPR station, the other the Claresholm CPR 
station, both a few miles south of Calgary. On 28 Jul 2010, the 
High River station (now Museum of the Highwood) sustained
fire damage

Click here to view more of this station and others that are
located in Calgary's Heritage Park

This pictures is from a framed photograph in a Calgary restaurant. 
It was submitted by Massey F. Jones
 
The former CPR station, at 406 – 1 Street SW in 
High River, Alberta on May 5th, 1989, now called 
"Museum of theHighwood" after the local river.

Constructed to replace a wooden station in 1911, the station 
(minus the original roof from one half of the 3rd CPR 
station in Calgary ), was transported to High River stone 
by stone by the CPR as a way to save money and it served
the town as the railway station from 1912 to 1965.

As a result of freight operation having moved to Lethbridge, 
the station then became redundant to the CPR, although the Dayliner continued to serve High River until 1971 
(see timetable 23 on this page). Located  elsewhere in 
High River, the Museum of the Highwood then leased 
the building from the CPR in 1972 and the Town of High 
River purchased it outright in 1977.

The Museum of the Highwood (housing mostly early 
ranching artifacts) was severely damaged by a fire in the 
roof on July 28, 2010.  It again suffered extensive damage 
to the basement during the June 2013 flood in Southern 
Alberta but a fair amount was saved. 
Admission is by donation.

 This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones  
The rail display adjacent to the Museum of the
Highwood (former High River CPR Station) on
5 May 1989, has now totally vanished. The station is to 
the far left. FM "C-Liner" CP 4104 and "Baby Trainmaster" CP 7009 are now in Nelson BC, as representatives of the Fairbanks -Morse
locomotives, previously operated in the area and s
erviced  in the Nelson shops and will become part of a project dubbed:
"Railtown" http://www.nelsonstar.com/news/
181686501.html
F7B CP 4459, here in red, can now be viewed in
maroon at http://www.mountainrailway.com/Roster%20
Archive/CP%204400A/CP%204459.htm
 This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones  

 
The latest of the CPR (later VIA) stations in Calgary closed its
doors in mid-January 1990. It was Calgary's 4th CPR station.

Now a bit of history. When the Canadian Pacific Railway 
arrived in 1883, it put its first station right in the 
middle of the
old RCMP garrison's horse pasture,
(almost across Fort Calgary). This was the
1st  station. Basically a boxcar without wheels. As the
population grew by leaps and bounds, the station went west 
near the present Palliser hotel in 1893, consisting of two 
buildings joined by a continuous canopy.
This was the 2nd station, shown elsewhere on this page. 
Between 1910 and 1911, it was dismantled brick by brick. 
The west half went to High River as their new station: http://www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx
?id=8189
and the east half to Claresholm:  http://www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx
?id=5742. 
In its place, a 3rd  station was constructed, covering
almost the entire city block. Made from locally 
quarried sandstone, it served Calgary till 1967. http://cdm280501.cdmhost.com/cdm/singleitem/
collection/p280501coll15/id/2387/rec/37., 
At that time it was leveled and the Calgary Tower (formerly  Husky Tower) was built in its place as a Canadian Centennial project.
Being 60% underground, it was decided by CPR that their 4th
station would be located in the basement. In 1978, VIA took
over CPR passenger service until abandonment of the southern half of their route through Banff and Lake Louise in January
1990. All VIA trains now travel through Edmonton and Jasper.

Entering the VIA station was by some steps shown in this view,
taken a week before the station closed for good. The store 
shown to the right of the picture used to be a Booth pharmacy.

 This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones  
The waiting room,  which had become woefully 
inadequate in latter years, with passengers and 
visitors standing almost  elbow to elbow.
 This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones  
The baggage area. With more and more visitors opting 
for a train trip through the Rockies, needless to say that 
the station wasn't your typical hometown railway station.
 This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones  
The counter area. The station would close within the 
week and most of the publicity (posters etc.) around 
the counter had been removed. 
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
Taber AB CPR Station, 123 miles from Calgary, near
Lethbridge. Taber is the corn capital of Canada 
"Taber corn" is a sweet variety, highly prized by 
Albertans. Originally, Taber was known as 
"Tank No. 77," and was used by the railway to fill 
up on water. In 1903, it is said that the first 
Mormon settlers from the U.S.A. were the ones to 
establish a hamlet at the Tank. After the town's post 
office was built in1907, the CPR decided to call thetown "Tabor," probably after Mount Tabor in the Holy Land. However, various 
letters and station heads came out printed "Taber," so the
CPR changed the name to make it match the records.An
alternate version of the towns name origin is that the first 
part of the word tabernacle was used by Mormon settlers 
in the vicinity, and the next Canadian Pacific Railway station 
was named Elcan (nacle spelled backwards). (Description 
from Wikipedia)
Photo: L. Unwin collection This picture was submitted by Massey Jones
Gliechen AB CPR Station, located 90km
East of Calgary
This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The former CN station at Hanna at 603 South Municipal 
Road is now the town's Visitor Information Centre.

The building was constructed in 1913 on the Canadian 
Northern Railway (CnoR) Goose Lake Line from 
Saskatoon to Calgary. Eventually acquired by CN, 
Hanna became a divisional point until 1900, second only 
to Edmonton.

Hanna is located in East-Central Alberta approximately
2 hours north-east of Calgary.

 Massey F. Jones Collection  


A CPR train stops at Bassano, Alberta; early 1900s 
shortly after the station opened. 
The town is located just off the Trans-Canada
Highway, 140km east of Calgary and 160km
west of Medicine Hat on the #1 Highway and named after 
the Italian Marquis de Bassano, a Canadian Pacific 
Railway financial backer during the mid-1800s  and 
construction west into to Calgary.

The station is a Canadian Pacific Standard #2 Station,
built in the same style as the Didsbury station shown on 
this page and greatly expanded over the years, before 
being closed in 1990, when VIA no longer served 
Southern Alberta. View a period picture of the front at http://www.canada-rail.com/alberta/
b/bassano.html#VChSr2fwtko and the CPR station 
classification system at http://www.okthepk.ca/dataCprSiding/articles/201205/
month00.htm#newsArticles

Following the termination of VIA service into southern 
Manitoba,
Alberta and BC in January 1990 (see the notice 
somewhere else on this page), the building sat empty for about 10 years and was about to be demolished. With a financial grant and
great fanfare, it was moved to Beiseker, Alberta 
for use as a railway museum on the west side of the 
village and some distance away from the Beiseker station. http://www.okthepk.ca/dataCprSiding/articles/201205/
news04.htm as well as http://www.okthepk.ca/dataCprSiding/articles/201205/
news03.htm and other links by the same source.
But the project encountered several technical difficulties. http://www.rockyviewweekly.com/article/20140414/
RVW0302/304149974/
beiseker-railway-museum-remains-stalled

More on the station: http://www.bigdoer.com/11995/exploring-history/
cpr-bassano-station/ and http://www.forthjunction.com/news-rockyview
0712-bassano-beiseker.htm

 Massey F. Jones collection  
CPR Beiseker station at 700, 1st Avenue, 
Beiseker, Alberta
The CPR station was decommissioned fifty years ago
and sat deserted for twenty-five years. In 1980 the 
Village of Beiseker recognized the historical importance
and value of the building and took steps to preserve and 
restore it. 
This building is a one-and-a-half storey structure with the 
distinctive design characteristic of CPR train stations.
This building stands prominently at the west end of the
village's main street. 
It was moved from the CPR track-way, turned 180
degrees and placed on a proper foundation on adjacent
Village of
Beiseker property. It now serves the village as the
Municipal Office, the Municipal Library, and the Beiseker Station 
Museum (description from Historic Places.ca)
Visitors can come to the museum year round during 
Village Office hours.  A  curator is available to give tours
during July and August. Adjacent to the station is an
EV caboose in fresh CP yellow paint.
 This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones  
A pen and ink drawing of the Beiseker, Alberta 
station in 1915; from a small framed photograph, 
most probably displayed in their Station Museum, 
at 700, 1st Avenue.There are also has several other
railway artifacts on site. http://www.beiseker.com/municipal-museum/
 Massey F. Jones collection  
CPR Western Lines "Standard A3 Station" in Central Alberta
March 26, 2014
 This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Booth, Willingdon AB  
CPR Western Lines "Standard A3 Station" in Central Alberta
March 26, 2014
I'll let Jim tell yuo how he got these pictures.
"The station sitting on a farm about 70K from here. The station was cut into two parts before being moved. The office/quarters end was placed on a concrete footing, & the freight room section was placed on the ground about 150 feet away. Both pieces still exist! >From what I have learned that the office /quarters section was going to be made into a home. As you can see it never happened.

It was about two weeks ago that I learned of it's existence while I was visiting the local town hall. I was also told that their was not a hope in hell that I could get on the property to photograph it. 
All the antique fixtures have been removed from the building by night time shoppers, the owners have had cattle, farm equipment stolen over the past few years. So I could understand why they would not want strangers on their property. So I drove out to the farm, and asked if I could enter the property and take pictures. 
The wife said no, but her husband came to the door and said ok, The site has cameras on it The gate at the entrance to the station location was chained & locked. So there I was,73 years old with 
bad knees. I got down on my stomach and crawled under the gate. Not a pretty sight!!
The farmer requested that I not give the exact location, so you
will not see it on the photographs. Could the station be restored!! Yes,but only if one had really deep pockets. I believe that a few years ago I sent you a CP set of plans for this type of station!"

 This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Booth, Willingdon AB  
CPR Western Lines "Standard A3 Station" in Central Alberta
March 26, 2014
 This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Booth, Willingdon AB  
CPR Western Lines "Standard A3 Station" in Central Alberta
Frieght room Section. March 26, 2014
 This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Booth, Willingdon AB  
CPR Western Lines "Standard A3 Station" in Central Alberta
Frieght room Section. March 26, 2014
 This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Booth, Willingdon AB  
Click on this image for a larger view in a new window
Click on this image for a larger view in a new window
Blue print for the CP "Western lines" Standard A3 Station. 
The station in the pictures is a reversal of the attached plan.
Also the station has sat in it’s present location for over 20
years, and sits at the top of a small hill. 
This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Booth, Willingdon AB  
CP Portable Station, Andrew AB. 
The Andrew building was a gift from the CP railway, 
it was never used at that location.
 This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Booth, Willingdon AB  
CP Portable Station, Andrew AB. 
The Andrew building was a gift from the CP railway,
it was never used at that location.
 This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Booth, Willingdon AB  
Click on this image for a larger view in a new window
Click on this image for a larger view in a new window
 Blue print for a CP Standard Portable Station
This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Booth, Willingdon AB  
CP Station, Andrew, AB
This station is now used as a senior center and museum
 This picture was taken and submitted James Booth, Willingdon AB  
Champion CPR Station, rescued from the wreckers and 
transported to a private property, along with some railway
artifacts, including CPR #19 (see my diesel page)

The station now located south of Calgary, 3 km north of 
Asldersyde on Highway 2, between the Okottoks turnoff and Alderside. , 19km south of Highway 22X. 
The site is not open to the public but serious visitors
may ask permission to enter.
 

The Village of Champion is located between Lethbridge 
and Calgary. Population 384 (2007 census)
The CPR opened the station in 1910 and it was named it 
after H.T. Champion, a prominent Winnipeg banker.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Champion,_Alberta 

This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones
The following series of pictures shows the Champion AB
station being moved as described in the picture above which 
was submitted by Massey F. Jones

To see what Champion Park is all about you might want to
look at this Video. Champion Park is private railway that
exists as a family tribute by Gerald Knowlton, his wife
and family to his father, 

The foundation was laid first

 This picture was taken and submitted by Chris Bruckshaw  
The Champion Station was located in Champion Alberta and 
moved to it's present location about 4 miles south of the
Okotoks turnoff on Hwy 2. Gerald Knowlton  the owner
purchased the station back in 1982-83 and had it restored. 
His Father was the station master of this station in Champion. 
Other buildings were built on site as well as an engine and a
few railway cars. In other words Mr. Knowlton has a real 
scale switching layout. The property has a lake stocked 
with trout and is mainly used for private functions.

The move was done by York Shaw Building Movers and 

Chris
was part of the crew.

The station was hauled into place

  This picture was taken and submitted by Chris Bruckshaw  
 and then slid on the foundation.
  This picture was taken and submitted by Chris Bruckshaw  
 It was then carefully put in place
  This picture was taken and submitted by Chris Bruckshaw  
 Next came the detail work
  This picture was taken and submitted by Chris Bruckshaw  
 and the finished product.
  This picture was taken and submitted by Chris Bruckshaw  
A CN Railiner blasts past DUAGH station, about 10 
miles straight north of Edmonton on the Coronado Sub 
on Friday September 12, 1958. This is a scan from a print 
which has become damaged with age.

The RDC served  St.Paul,  Grand Centre and
RCAF/CFB Cold Lake, on the Alberta-Saskatchewan
border, until the VIA took over and terminated
passenger service.

Massey F. Jones collection   
CN DUAGH is second from the bottom on this 
employee timetable from April 1978. It doesn't show
any passenger service as VIA had earlier decided to
terminate a public service that had been ongoing for
many years.

During its operation, passengers left North Edmonton
on the Vegreville Sub, reaching the Coronado Sub 3.5
miles later. At Abilene Jct, the train veered northeast 
into the Bonnyville Sub, reaching Grand Centre at 
Mileage 61.1 . There have been several changes since 
this timetable was published, including different
ownership and/or abandonment of portions of the track.

 Massey F. Jones collection  
The CN Stop at FORT KENT, a hamlet in Central Alberta
within the Municipal District of Bonnyville, Alberta.
It is an example of prefabricated portable structures
dropped off along the way in many hamlets, in the early days.
Serving as a flag stop, the building also held supplies for
railway servicing.

Fort Kent is approximately 32 km (20 miles) southwest
of Cold Lake and has a population of about 200.
The photo is dated April 1965.

 Massey F. Jones collection
This picture was taken and submitted James Booth, Willingdon AB
CP Station, Willington, AB
This station is located at the Shandro museum just
north of town. It is intact but unheated and has 
no electricty.
This picture was taken and submitted James Booth, Willingdon AB
CP Station, Willington, AB
This picture was taken and submitted James Booth, Willingdon AB
CP Station, Willington, AB
This picture was taken and submitted James Booth, Willingdon AB
CP Station Vegreville, AB
This station is used as a bottle depot.
This picture was taken and submitted James Booth, Willingdon AB
CN Station, Vegerville, AB taken on Jan 6, 2005
It looks cold that day and Jim says that it was about 
minus 30 degrees C .
This picture was taken and submitted James Booth, Willingdon AB
CN Station, Vegerville, AB taken on Jan 6, 2005
This picture was taken and submitted James Booth, Willingdon AB
CN Station Viking Alberta, May 2005
This station is on the line between
Edmonton & Wainwright AB
This picture was taken and submitted by Jim Booth, Willingdon AB
Formerly the CNR and VIA station in downtown Edmonton
(until the rails were removed to make way for construction 
of the Grant McEwan University Downttown Campus and
VIA Rail moved its passenger station further north), this
building at 10004 104 Ave NW served as CN headquarters 
in Western Canada for many of its operations on 13 of its 26 
floors, and one of Edmonton's tallest buildings at 111 metres
(364 ft) in its time. 
My Diesel page shows a black & white photo of the
Super Continental behind the building in the 70s.

Built in 1966,the CN Tower was vacated by CN in May 2008 http://www.cawcouncil4000.com
and all western  operations consolidated within a new
building in Walker Yard, further north.

This view, taken in October 2011 shows that the CN logo 
still remains on the building, despite new owners, 
as it has become an Edmonton landmark.
More at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CN_Tower_(Edmonton)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmonton_(Via_Rail_station)

 This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones  
The VIA Rail station, at 12360-121 Street NW in Edmonton,
Alberta is situated next to the former Edmonton City Centre
(Blatchford Field) airport – now decommissioned and a couple 
of blocks south of the CN Walker yard.

It was opened  in 1998 following the closure of the downtown 
Via Rail station which was located in the lower level of 
Edmonton's CN Tower, front and back of it shown on this page.

Google Earth Street View - Submitted by Massey F. Jones
The VIA Rail Edmonton Station trackside
 This picture was taken and submitted by Massey F. Jones  
EX CN Station Edson AB May 2005
This picture taken and submitted James Booth, Willingdon AB
EX NAR Station Peace River Alta, Sept 2004
This picture taken and submitted James Booth, Willingdon AB
EX NAR Station Peace River Alta, Sept 2004
This picture taken and submitted James Booth, Willingdon AB
CN Fort Saskatchewan AB Station Jan 2005
This picture taken and submitted James Booth, Willingdon AB
Alberta Railway and Coal Co Station 1890,
ex CPR Coutts located at Galt Historic Railway Park,
County of Warner Alberta.

This photo taken in about 1910 of the international border, includes the employees of the Coutts Sweetgrass International Customs Depot, Train Station. 
Building built in 1890 by Alberta Railway and Coal Co. designated Port of Entry, owned by Sir Alexander Galt, founder of Lethbridge and a Father of Confederation. 

Bill found the following information on this station.
"We did find out from the Government of Alberta, that
this building is the only remaining example of three that existed when the west was open for settlement. 
One was in Manitoba, the other in British Columbia.
To my knowledge it is  the only one every owned
by a Father of Canada's
Confederation 1867, also the only privately owned international narrow gage rail line owned by Galt's 
company running from Lethbridge to Great Falls
Montana. CPR were not impressed but he had
friends in high places."

This picture was submitted by Bill Hillen, Lethbridge Alberta
Coutts Sweetgrass International Port of Entry,
Coutts Alberta 1910
This picture was submitted by Bill Hillen, Lethbridge Alberta
CCPR and Great Northern. Port of Entry, 
Coutts Alberta 1910
This picture was submitted by Bill Hillen, Lethbridge Alberta
CPR and Great Northern. Port of Entry, 
Coutts Alberta 1910
This picture was submitted by Bill Hillen, Lethbridge Alberta
Moving the former Coutts CPR station out of Coutts
May 2000
This picture was submitted by Bill Hillen, Lethbridge Alberta

Former CPR Coutts station now restored to it's original
configuration of 1890 then owned by the 
Alberta Railway and Coal Co.
This picture was submitted by Bill Hillen, Lethbridge Alberta
Alberta Railway and Coal Co. station open summers
at GHRP
This picture was submitted by Bill Hillen, Lethbridge Alberta
ARCC station 9,000 sq ft. Platform looking
east at GHRP 2010
 This picture was submitted by Bill Hillen, Lethbridge Alberta  

Links to the other areas of Canada


The Maritimes
Quebec and Ontario
British Columbia and the Territories

Return to Old Canadian Train Stations

 

Two site worth looking at.

The Memory Lane Railway Museum in Middleton, Nova Scotia.
The only exclusive Dominion Atlantic Railway museum in the world

Welcome to the DAR DPI
A web community initiative intent on digitally preserving
the history of the Dominion Atlantic Railway


Links
Visit our Home in Summerville Nova Scotia. This house was built in 1873.
Where we live and what we do
A Nova Scotia Snow Storm Hits Summerville
A Nova Scotia Snow Storm Hits Summerville
The Halifax & South-Western Museum
The Steam Locomotives of the CPR
The Steam Engines of the CNR
The Newfoundland Railway
Robot Cars
Old Canadian Rolling Stock 
Passenger Cars
Old Canadian Rolling Stock 
Freight Cars
Electric Locomotives and Street Cars
Industrial and on Site Diesel  Locomotives
The Scrap Yard
Canadian Old Logging Equipment
and Steam and Diesel Locomotives
Train Bridges and Trestles
Canadian Railway Tunnels with a detailed look 
at the CPR Spiral Tunnels
Canadian Railway Artifacts
The Grain Elevators of Western Canada
Old Diesels and other rolling stock
   
Canadian National Railways Motive Power Statistics Index
Railway Maintenance Equipment
And Old Railway Rolling Stock
Jerry Barnes' Garden Railway, The SCRR
The Nova Scotia Railway Heritage Society
The Nova Scotia Railway Heritage Society
Historic Aircraft Pictures
Visit John's Old Car and Truck Pictures
The Yard Limit's page on the 
Windsor & Hantsport Railway (WHRC)
CN Pensioners' Association
The Stanley Steamer

For all you steam fans, this page 
is a must

Visit Lonnie Hedgepeth's 
of Rocky Mount, North Carolina site.
He has used the plans provided on Covered Bridge Plans  webpage and is building a Covered Bridge for his 
Live Steam train.
Many new pictures have been added including pictures of his Live Steam Engine
The building trades class at Darlington HS in Darlington, Wisconsin built this covered bridge for a local business man
 Tour the 64 remaining Covered Bridges
 of New Brunswick
The Covered Bridges that once 
dotted Nova Scotia.
Lilies From the Valley
A Vast selection of Oriental and Asiatic previously cut commercially grown bulbs ready for shipment 
anywhere in Canada
Visit my Jeep page
A Picture Review of the Jeeps
from 1940 to the present
A Picture Review of the
Nash, Hudson and the cars of American Motors
A Picture Review of the Old cars
that were found in Australia
A Picture Review Studebaker
A Picture review of the Packard
A Picture Review of the
Pickup Truck from 1940 to 1969
A Picture review of the Volkswagen
A Picture Tour of the Kaiser Frazer
A Picture Tour of the
A Picture Tour of the Henry J
A Picture Tour of the Crosley
A Picture Review of the Chevrolet
from 1916 tto 1970's
A Picture Review of the Ford
from 1908 to 1970's
The Chrysler Airflow
View some of John Evan's  Artwork
View some of
John' Evan's Artwork 
This site has quite a collections of John's artwork.
View these old cars as you haven't before.
Eric Gordon's Kaiser Rebuild
There are many pictures showing the
details of this Rebuild
E Mail
johnmacdonald@summerville-novascotia.com

 
 
 


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